8 Brooklyn Wallpaper Designers to Watch

The other day we were scrolling through our source list of wallpaper designers, when we realized that a ton of new and established pattern people are based in Brooklyn. It's not super-surprising — Brooklyn has a reputation as an incubator for young, talented designers — but it does seem like there's a very high percentage of them living in close range of one another. Here are eight on our radar. If we're missing anyone, help us out and add their names in the comments.

  1. Kimberly Lewis: Kimberly designs light, airy wallpaper that combines mod geometric patterns with feminine colors. Everything is "hand-printed in the United States using environmentally friendly water-based ink and clay-coated paper."
  2. Flat Vernacular: Payton Cosell Turner and her fiancé, Brian Kaspr make and sell "original hand-drawn, hand-printed, and bespoke wallpapers" in patterns with oddball titles like "Beastly Guardians" and "Dandelion Creatures."
  3. Aimee Wilder: A graduate of The School of the Art Institute of Chicago, Aimee worked for Dwell, Martha Stewart Living, Bed Bath and Beyond, Crate and Barrel and others before opening her Brooklyn studio and forging her own hip style.
  4. Eskayel: Shanan Campanaro of Eskayel creates wallpaper made from digitally manipulated portions of her colorful paintings — many of the patterns have a watercolor-like color quality when viewed closely.
  5. Flavor Paper: Founder and designer Jon Sherman lives in Cobble Hill, Brooklyn, where New York Magazine toured his studio last year. His studio works with several contemporary designers to make bright, trippy wallpapers in both hand-screened and digitally printed patterns.
  6. Oneiric Design: This studio focuses on custom wallpaper in hand-blocked or digitally printed versions. The digital prints include "repositionable wallpaper stock that can be made in any color combination on the Pantone scale."
  7. Twenty2: Kyra and Robertson Hartnett make hand-screened wallpaper and fabrics inspired by nature and graphic patterns. They recently started working in grasscloth as well.
  8. Filthy Home: Ryan Cox worked in licensing at Playboy before — according to his personal life story — he eventually turned 30, "finally recognized he was a grown up, moved into a one bedroom in Brooklyn by HIMSELF, and embraced his inner perv." His site includes a collection of semi-smutty matte vinyl wallpaper printed with non-solvent based inks.


Are we leaving anyone out? Let us know in the comments!

Images: As linked above