3 Places to Find Out About Tech Recalls

3 Places to Find Out About Tech Recalls

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Taryn Williford
Jan 20, 2011

As many Toyota drivers can tell you, a nationwide recall of one of your oft-used devices can be a major headache. But no matter how many loops you have to jump through to get reimbursed or get your gear replaced by the recall company (It can be a real pain, trust us), it's definitely better to be in-the-know when your safety's at stake. Can you guess how many Americans who purchased a recalled product in the past 3 years were aware of the fact? It's shockingly low.

According to a Consumer Reports poll published in December, only one-fifth of U.S. adults were aware they purchased food, medication, or a product (other than a car) that was recalled in the past three years.

So approximately 80 percent of your neighbors could be taking recalled medication or living in homes with recalled appliances. That's a scary figure. Especially if you're one of them.

So how can you stay on the safe side? Keep yourself informed. Here's three places where you can find out if your tech has been recalled:

1. From the Company
You know that stack of papers that stands between you and your sweet, sweet new gadgety goodness once you open the box? Yeah, we usually throw all that junk away too. But if you take a second to fill out that registration card with your contact info, you can rest assured knowing that the company who manufactured your new fridge or camera will be able to contact you if there's been a safety recall.

2. From the Government
If you're not interested in giving up your email address, you're going to need to seek out product recall info yourself. A great place to do that is the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission's Recalls.gov website. There, you'll find a search-able database of all known recalls.

3. From Consumer Reports
If you want more specific details than just a yes/no answer, you can keep up with Consumer Reports' Safety Alert blog. The non-profit consumer magazine always gives extensive, up-to-the-minute details on new product recalls. They'll tell you if a product is seriously dangerous or if it was simply mislabeled.


(Source for top image photo illustration: Flickr member sylvar licensed for use under Creative Commons. Bottom image: Flickr member j_bary licensed for use under Creative Commons.)

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