No-Fail Design Tricks: How To Make Any Room Feel More Spacious

No-Fail Design Tricks: How To Make Any Room Feel More Spacious

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Adrienne Breaux
Feb 12, 2015
(Image credit: Via Nuevo Estilo )

For anyone who's ever lived in a tiny home or had a home with very small spaces, the obsession with wanting to make a room look and feel bigger than it is can take over your life. Though there are many tricks, none are quite as effective and versatile as the four in this post. Trick your eye and fool your mind into thinking you have more space than you do!

Pictured above: Via Nuevo Estilo.

1. Make a very large surface reflective

Adding mirrors to the wall in a room is a great idea, believe us. But do you really want to change the whole look of a room and make it seem larger? Take over an entire surface with reflective materials. That could be anything from using one huge, oversized mirror on a wall, or getting creative with smaller mirrors to fill a wall. It could be using shiny stainless steel on a kitchen island that bounces light throughout the space. Spotted on Design*Sponge via The Inspired Room.

2. Keep it smooth

We don't mean you should avoid materials that sport wonderful textures in your space — far from it. No what we mean is along with tabletops and counters (keep them clear of clutter), consider cutting down on the amount of decorative elements "sticking out" into the space. From lights that hang down in the way of things or stick out from the wall, to heavy hardware on cabinets and furniture pieces. Keeping more surfaces smooth will cut the feeling of clutter and help visually expand the space.

(Image credit: Lonny)

3. Make it monochromatic

While pops of color can be exciting and a bold focal piece really bring the drama, if you want to make a room feel more spacious, stick to only one or two colors (or similar shades of the same hue) and spread it evenly throughout the space. You can avoid being boring by deftly layering objects in vignettes and using textures dramatically. And though some say you should stick to light colors, we won't force you under that limitation; we think any color could work. Via Lonny.

4. Blend and disappear

You don't have to jump on the minimalism bandwagon to have a room that feels bigger than it is (though, that can certainly help). You just need to reduce the visual weight of certain heavy, imposing objects in a space. So paint chunky furniture the same color as your walls, use clear objects and Plexiglas to add structure without visual weight. Make heaviness and clutter blend or disappear. Room and photo by Erin Williamson of Design Crisis.

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