5 Lessons to Learn from a Truly Kickass Gallery Wall

5 Lessons to Learn from a Truly Kickass Gallery Wall

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David Telford
Jun 12, 2015
(Image credit: David Telford)

Remember Paula and Paul's fantastic house tour from a few weeks ago which showed off their enviable art and collectables in various areas of the house? We're focusing on the crowning glory of that amazing gallery wall to give the rest of us some pointers on how to keep a staid feature alive with new possibilities.

1. Go mono
If you're lucky enough to have a large amount of similarly colored pieces, group them together on the wall and create a whole section that has a consistent palette. Paula and Paul went strictly black and white but the other half of the wall is consistently bright. You could try different shades or visual themes such as lines, silhouettes, or portraits, for example.

(Image credit: David Telford)

2. Wrap around
The entire top third of this room follows the black and white motif. The monochrome art is displayed on the end wall as well as the main gallery, and the furniture and tableware are all on theme. If you've ever wanted to be in a black and white movie, this is a good place to get your bearings.

(Image credit: David Telford)

3. Off the wall
Right along the monumental wall the pieces seem to fall off and encroach on the lounge/diner below. From a bright lamp to cushions that color-match the nearest framed art, the blurred boundaries can draw you in so you feel part of the design itself.

(Image credit: David Telford)

4. Two dimensions is so passé
Grab that trinket you never quite found the right shelf for and mount it! Paula and Paul found an eye-catching way to display a find from Mexico. There's also a vintage bird cage in the black and white section.

(Image credit: David Telford)

5. Mirror mirror on the wall
Even if you don't have a couple of Warhols ready to hang, you can create a dynamic focus for the wall by pairing two pieces of similar composition, colour, or style. Paula and Paul found a fantastic way to create a "wow" moment for anyone entering the room and seeing the wall for the first time. It highlights their inventive use of splitting the room into color and monochrome.

Do you spot anything else that works or do you have other ideas? Share in the comments below!

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