6 Steps To Safer Windows In Your Family's Rental

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A study run from 1990 to 2008 discovered that 98,415 were injured through falling from windows over that time. That equates to around 5,000 children per year. 1 per cent of these falls resulted in death. No question about it: if you have a small child in your home then window safety is essential. But how to do it? Especially when the place you're living in doesn't belong to you? Here are six steps to consider in protecting your little ones from injury around your rental windows.

1. Keep cribs/beds away from windows. It's just not safe. If your kids are old enough, move away any furniture that allows a child to climb up to the window also.

2. Check your cords. Do your window coverings have cords or ties? They must be looped up high, far from your tallest child's reach. If looping or shortening the cord is not possible, consider removing hazardous blinds and replacing them with simple curtains until you end up moving out. If your landlord is thinking through new window coverings, request an option that is specifically designed with a child's safety in mind.

3. Remember, window screens are not enough. Window screens were made to keep bugs out, not little ones in. Even if they appear sturdy, they are not sturdy enough to prevent a fall.

4. Install a window stop. A properly installed window stop will prevent a window from opening wider than a pre-set space. This space should be carefully measured to be less than the width of your child's head. There are no-screw options that can easily be removed after you're gone.

5. Or...a window guard. Like the ones from Guardian Angel. Before installing a safety guard, check with your state's safety requirements. Some US states actually require landlords to install window guards for tenants who have children 10 years and under. Do search online to check if that includes you. A little googling could save you hundreds of dollars! A window guard will allow you to open the window wider, allowing more air to flow through the room.

6. Supervision is key. No matter

(Image credits: Shutterstock/Shutterstock)

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