A Designer's Own Guest Room/Office Makeover

Professional Project

Pin it button big

Project by: Audra Canfield Interiors & Designer Fluff
Location: Brooklyn

Living in New York City for the past 10 years has taught me how to really make a room multi-functional. I am a designer with two companies working from home. So, it is important to have a functional, attractive space away from distractions. Prior to moving my office into our bedroom, I was working at either the dining room table or the small kitchen built-in desk. I hated having my fabrics, notebooks, sketch pad and laptop out all the time disrupting and cluttering up the public space. 

Pin it button big


Our house has one small bedroom and one large bedroom. I decided to turn the large bedroom into a den/guest bedroom/office for my husband. This left me without my own office space. So, I soon began reworking plans of our master bedroom layout. The first step was updating our furniture. Because this was the last space to receive attention, this room had become the home for all of our hand-me-downs including an antique iron bed, my college dresser and tall china cabinet used for clothes. 

As a designer, I always start with an inspirational object or image when designing a space. In this case, we purchased two graphic prints by graphic designer, Carin Goldberg, from Fab.com. My husband and I couldn't live without them- even though we had no idea where they should go. Once I made the decision to move my office upstairs, they became the color palette and inspiration for the re-design. 

I left the wall color the same, Benjamin Moore Lenox Tan HC-44, which worked nicely with the new scheme. I put together a spreadsheet for the new furniture to stay on track with our budget and created a new floor plan segregating the office area as much as possible. 

Pin it button big


We chose a bed first, the Tate Bed from Crate & Barrel, since the bed is usually the focal point of a bedroom and establishes the room's concept. The Tate has a mid-century modern feel so we paired it with Danish style bedside tables from West Elm. Our existing tall cabinet is a dark, ebony stained glass piece which references the craftsman era. 

When choosing the desk material, I wanted to bring in another finish besides wood hence the Metal Parsons Desk from West Elm. The Oslo Chair from Crate & Barrel not only reflects the period, but also adds a nice woven texture and ties in the walnut from the bedside tables. Our existing white lacquer file cabinet and printer table, both from West Elm, flank either side of the desk. The Metal Floor Mirror from West Elm reflects light and gives the illusion of more space in the small room. Plus, it carries the metal finish around the room. I feel it's important to repeat finishes in a space for a cohesive, balanced room. 

Another example of repeated elements is the bold black of the prints and shams which is balanced by the over-scaled black ceramic lamp from One Kings Lane, one of my favorite sites for interior design products. They will be launching our Designer Fluff pillows on March 14th!

Pin it button big


Lastly, I added the accessories, which are the jewelry for interior design. They add texture and pull the room together. Our existing Moroccan blanket, linen bedding by Matteo and the recycling/waste bin, the Savannah Basket from Pottery Barn, give the room texture. The basket is on wheels making it easy to move in and out from beneath the desk. The Metal Mesh bright orange desk accessories from The Container Store add playfulness and repeat the circle motif in the artwork. Finally, our own Designer Fluff shams in Black & White Geo fabric and decorative pillow in Orange Canyon create the focal point and reinforce our continuing theme of graphic pattern and nod to the mid-century era. 

The major concept elements of the room were as follows:

  • Graphic prints in both the bedding and the artwork.
  • Furniture and pattern referenced from Mid-Century era
  • Color palette of saturated orange, black, white, beige and gray.

Thanks, Audra!

• Are you a designer/architect/decorator interested in sharing a residential project with Apartment Therapy readers? Contact the editors through our Professional Project Submission Form.

(Images: via Audra Canfield Interiors & Designer Fluff)

You Might Also Like

Around the Web

Categories

Main

Janel Laban is the Executive Editor of Apartment Therapy and has been working here, at the dreamiest of dream jobs, since March 2006.