Pro Design Lessons: Ways to Add Color & Pattern with Rebecca of Territory Design

Pro Design Lessons: Ways to Add Color & Pattern with Rebecca of Territory Design

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Julia Brenner
Sep 22, 2015
(Image credit: Julia Brenner)

When we featured the House Tour of Rebecca Crall, owner of Territory, a design and textile company focused on authentic, creative, handmade goods, readers were inspired by the way she uses bright, bold textiles to decorate her home. Rebecca kindly offered to demonstrate some easy ways to add color and pattern to your home using her own products.

(Image credit: Apartment Therapy )

As the daughter of globe trekkers (Rebecca's parents lived in both Southeast Asia and North Africa), Rebecca's childhood home was filled with textiles and art from faraway places, which had a big influence on her design sensibility as well as her interest in working with communities overseas.

Rebecca's own home is a gorgeous mix of natural light and white walls combined with neutral furniture, natural fibers, and colorful textiles. It's a fantastic formula for creating a calm yet warm environment and is the type of decorating that works with most budgets.

All of Territory's products are sourced directly from artisans and collectives in Morocco, Thailand, and Mexico. Along with showcasing beautiful items, Rebecca is passionate about participating in the slow design and handmade movement that supports traditional artisans and processes in both the developing world and in the U.S. It is part of Rebecca's mission that every Territory piece is imbued with story and history, which she hopes "inspires and enlivens a space with a culturally unique sensibility." Let's check out some examples of her textiles doing their thing.

(Image credit: Julia Brenner)

Rebecca breaks up all the natural wood of her dining room furniture and floors with a patterned woven rug from Morocco.

(Image credit: Julia Brenner)

Here Rebecca demonstrates that both dark and bright patterned rugs work wonderfully in the same room alongside a brightly patterned wall hanging that doesn't "match" either rug in the traditional color-coordinated sense.

(Image credit: Rebecca Crall )

Rebecca acquires her products from local artisans and collectives; she acquired the stunning rugs shown here from a two-sister team in Morocco that employs weavers in various parts of the country. Along with knowing the techniques used to create her goods, Rebecca also knows and shares the stories of the artisans and their communities.

(Image credit: Julia Brenner)
(Image credit: Julia Brenner)

Pretty simplicity: textured woven place mats, cloth napkins in a bowl, and a spray of greenery over a naturally-dyed handwoven runner are all unfussy options for an elegant tabletop. Spending time in Rebecca's home was a nice reminder for me that there is a wealth of beautiful, budget-friendly home decor that is sustainably produced and that honors traditional textile arts.

(Image credit: Julia Brenner)

Neutrals + brightly patterned textiles = a beautiful combination of colors and textures that are not matchy-matchy yet play incredibly well together. I especially love the placement of a patterned woven rug alongside a nubby, neutral jute rug.

(Image credit: Rebecca Crall)

Here is the same principle of natural materials plus vivid textiles at work in her son's nursery. I find this setup very soothing and a welcome change of pace from the overly-darling, Pinterestified nurseries we're so used to seeing.

(Image credit: Julia Brenner)

Here's another example that shows a lovely, balanced mix of textures and patterns.

(Image credit: Julia Brenner)

Batiks, handwoven wall hangings from Indonesia, are a striking option for large-scale wall decor. I love Rebecca's use of fabric wall hangings throughout her home.

(Image credit: Julia Brenner)

Small but mighty: I would not have thought one basket could pack such a punch, but check out how these gorgeous jewel-toned baskets turn an otherwise bland corner of the living room into one that is visually interesting and purposeful, serving as a nice little storage solution.

(Image credit: Rebecca Crall)

The lovely palm fiber baskets featured above are handwoven in Oaxaca. While the baskets are traditionally made by families and individuals for sale in local markets, Rebecca located a family that works with a collective of female weavers to produce the baskets sold by Territory.

Rebecca's Favorites

I asked Rebecca to pass along some of the textile and handmade decor companies she finds inspiring.

  • Maya Mueble: A Chicago-based business, Maya Mueble is working with Guatemalan artisans to create gorgeous, sustainable furniture. I love the collaborative spirit I’ve observed in the way they work with the artisans.
  • Fait la Force: I’m super-impressed with Emma Allen’s commitment to working in Haiti, country that has undergone a tremendous amount of collective stress and deprivation- especially in the last five years. The vision and aesthetic behind Fait la Force is such a testament to the ingenuity and artisan skill waiting to be discovered, even in some of the most challenging places on earth.
  • Production Mode: I have a tremendous amount of respect for what Jamie Hayes is doing with her company, Production Mode. Jamie works with a local, sustainable leather tannery here in Chicago to source all of her leather and with local artisans, paying them a fair wage to create these truly unique garments.
  • Seek Collective: If you want to get serious about sustainabilty, natural dye, and weaving processes, Carol Miltimore of Seek Collective is your woman! I have absolutely loved getting to know Carol and discovering someone who is TRULY dedicated to making sustainability a hallmark of her line.
  • Archive New York: Amira Marion of Archive New York is doing really interesting work with the textile traditions of Guatemala. She finds vintage and antique fabrics and then transforms those designs into beautiful silk print pillows.

Head on over to Territory for other beautiful items and to read more about Rebecca's work in the textile industry and check her out on Instagram. Thanks, Rebecca!

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