Architectural Digest Showcases Open Auditions: Michael Marienthal in Chicago

Architectural Digest Showcases Open Auditions: Michael Marienthal in Chicago

Heather Blaha
Aug 19, 2008

Michael Marienthal fell in love with this 1936 building by Andrew Rebori: Constructed in 1936 for a Marshall Field executive, the four-story Moderne building houses 12 duplexes and one triplex. Its curving walls and art-glass windows first caught the attention of photographer Michael Marienthal when he was a teenager. Fast-forward to 2000, when he saw an open-house listing for the property. Take a look inside below:

"I was not at all interested in buying something," he recalls. "But I'd never forgotten the complex. How could I resist?"

The structure was in disrepair, but he found his way to the triplex at the rear and was immediately transported by its volumes and light. "It was kind of a ruin, but it was so magical," he says. "I was struck by the play of light on the walls. I knew I'd never find another place like it."

A curving stairwell connects all three floors.
Before

After: In the living room, "all the bones are original," says Marienthal, who worked with architect Darcy Bonner. Photographs complement a WPA painting.

Before

After: Well-preserved art-glass windows by Edgar Miller and a painting by Abbott Pattison are in the library. Low table from B&B Italia. Ralph Lauren Home end table.

Elsewhere in the room is a Le Corbusier chaise by Cassina.
Before
After: A wall was re-moved and the ceiling raised in the master bedroom. A Oaxacan vase, an Inuit stone head and a Marienthal photograph from 1994 complete the space. The bed is from Poliform.

Read the full article here.

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