Are Some Things Too Important to Trust with Technology?

Are Some Things Too Important to Trust with Technology?

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Taryn Williford
Nov 2, 2010

It's election day. Many people are already up and ready to cast votes, and most of them are wondering if it's even worth it. With so much controversy about the security of electronic ballots, voters are left wondering if their e-votes will even count. It just goes to show you: Some things are too important to trust with technology.

With local news headlines like Automated Voting Machines Get 2nd Chance and Voting Machine Problems Already, it's clear that people everywhere are weary of automated polling machines.

Voting machines across the country have been found to have wacky glitches worthy of a Saved by the Bell episode, like flipping votes from one candidate to another. And many people argue that they're easily manipulated. When democracy is at stake, some argue that we should take the slow and steady road without tech.

So what can we apartment dwellers learn from this?

Technology fails. It's a fact of life.

If there's anything super-important to your life—your phone's contact list or last year's tax return—make sure you keep a back-up copy.

And if you're really worried that computers are out to get us—like, tin-foil-hat-worried—then you might want to go low-tech and keep a paper copy somewhere, too. You know, just in case.


(Images: Flickr user Matt Blaze under license from Creative Commons, Flickr user jcolman under license from Creative Commons.)

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