Before & After: An Aging Bathroom Enters the Modern Era

Before & After: An Aging Bathroom Enters the Modern Era

98cac5b8824ffa9dfec076061c9bc13f5981f2d1?w=240&h=240&fit=crop
Nancy Mitchell
Apr 7, 2015
(Image credit: Sweeten)

At 50+ years old, this vintage bathroom was starting to show its age. The sink and tub were pitted and dented, and since replacing them would mean subbing in new tiles that didn't match the old, vintage ones, the homeowners decided to go for a full remodel — and bring this aging bathroom into the modern era.

Between them, these two homeowners knew quite a bit about interior design. Howard is an architect who now works in education, and Grazyna is an interior designer and associate professor. They had a very specific idea about what they wanted for their bathroom, and wanted to find a contractor who would give this smaller project the attention it deserved. They found him at Sweeten, a New York-area resource that connects homeowners with designers, architects, and contractors. Sweeten connected them with Alan, whose previous experiences remodeling smaller apartments made him a perfect fit for the job.

(Image credit: Sweeten)

Although the technicolor orange of the 'before' bathroom might have tempted other folks to go with an all-white scheme, Howard and Grazyna decided to take a different direction in their remodel. They wanted a bathroom that celebrated its purpose, one inspired by the color and flow of water. So they chose translucent greenish-blue glass tiles, laid in a horizontal pattern that evokes movement, and cool grey ceramic tiles for the floor. Using the same tile in the shower and in the rest of the room creates continuity, and larger format tiles mean there's less grout to clean.

Switching the tub for a shower was a practical choice — it will be much easier for the homeowners to get in and out of as they grow older. But it's also a boon for this small bathroom, helping to open up the room significantly. Alan took advantage of the space under the shower bench and built custom concealed storage there.

(Image credit: Sweeten)

Howard designed the vanity, which Alan had constructed out of engineered stone. It has a sleek look, a small footprint, and a concealed spot for hanging hand towels (which also help to conceal the plumbing).

(Image credit: Sweeten)

Toiletries live in the new oversized medicine cabinet, which has concealed plugs for small appliances. Everything is tucked away to keep the overall look of the bathroom sleek and airy.

Want to see more photos and read more about this project? Check out the project page on Sweeten.

Created with Sketch.