Before & After: Bright & Beautiful Nashville Kitchen Renovation

Before & After: Bright & Beautiful Nashville Kitchen Renovation

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Julia Brenner
Oct 4, 2015
(Image credit: Brian Copeland )

When Brian and Greg purchased a 1,500 sq. ft., 1960's-era ranch house that had been on the market for over 500 days, they knew they could turn it into something special. A first priority was turning an 11 x 12 kitchen that comfortably fit one person into a bright, open space that met their needs as a growing family and frequent hosts. I would say they achieved their goal...a thousand times over.

(Image credit: Brian Copeland)

Beauty and charm for days...

Here's Brian's story:

After living in the home (we call our property Stewards' Grove) for a little over two years, we'd had enough and began the redesign process in November 2014.

**(Greg in their "Before" kitchen)

(Image credit: Brian Copeland)

Greg is a pastor so it was normal for us to host 50-100 at our downtown home. When we moved to the country, our hosting went down to four to six people at a time. We wanted a kitchen that was more than anything functional and large enough to host friends. We started off with the mentality that we just wanted large and functional. Design really didn't matter much. Then we made the mistake of walking into Cenwood Appliances in Nashville. Greg saw the 60" Wolf oven and casually said, "Honey, this is my dream." I called the salesperson over and asked the price. After my heart calmed, I started thinking about how we live in an affordable house in a humble community, so we can certainly afford some hoopty appliances.

**(Pictured below: hoopty appliances)

(Image credit: Brian Copeland)

Every step of the design process, I could see the vendors and workers politely grinning in confusion. My advocating of the cabinet color (Farrow & Ball's Blue Ground) made me feel like a Dreamgirls Diva. But, while at a small shop in Portland, I met a designer who was at the height of her career in the 60s. She'd overheard me explaining my goals for our new kitchen. She said, "Excuse me. I don't mean to overstep boundaries, but I am a color specialist. I was designing homes in the period your home was built. This color here is exactly the color I was using in kitchens back then. Go with this and trust me." So I did. I protected the color all the way through the process. Every cabinet manufacturer we went to refused or said it wasn't in their palette. We found a guy out in the sticks of Tennessee who builds cabinets out of a metal shed. He just smiled when I showed him the color and that was that.

Greg really wanted a cutting board countertop. I can't say I was on board with it at first. I knew that if we did wood, it would need to have an artisan flair. I happened across a young 20-something who built some tables for a coffee shop. We were thrilled with his concept and the price. I found the tile flooring at a local tile store. Everyone thinks it's wood. Once I had made all the selections, I panicked. I realized that I hadn't put any of these elements together to see if they actually worked. I was honestly sick to my stomach. The bills had been paid and everything was underway.

**(Kitchen during construction)

(Image credit: Brian Copeland)
When I walked into the shell of a kitchen a few weeks before it was finished, my stomach sank. I had blue cabinets and nothing else in the room. My mom gave it the compliment of death, "Oh, Brian. It looks so, so, so...um...functional." I was even sicker. I kept my game face and just hoped it would all come together. We left for a family vacation and I told myself to leave the worry back in Nashville. When we got home, I walked through the door to find an almost complete kitchen with all my selections. I felt it was a home run. I liked it. Well, I loved it actually.
(Image credit: Brian Copeland )
(Image credit: Brian Copeland)
(Image credit: Brian Copeland )
(Image credit: Brian Copeland )
(Image credit: Brian Copeland)

The crew, including Micah and Esther, in their gorgeous new kitchen.

Fun fact: If Brian looks familiar, it's because the Nashville-based Realtor is also a favorite of HGTV's House Hunters.

Inspiring fact: Brian and Greg founded one of the only food pantries in North Nashville, feeding more than 175 families each month. In 2014, the pantry won the Mary Catherine Strobel Volunteer of the Year Award.

Great people, great story, great kitchen!

SOURCES:

  • Cabinet Color Farrow & Ball Blue Ground No. 210
  • Wall Color Farrow & Ball Great White No. 2006
  • Cabinets by Hackert & Sons in Westmoreland, Tennessee
  • Lenova Stainless Steel Sink Faucet with Side Sprayer SK300
  • Elkay Explore™ 29-1/2 in. Single-Bowl Undermount Fine Fireclay Farm Apron Sinks
  • Lowes Kenroy Home Casey 7-in W Chrome Hardwired Standard Mini Pendant Light
  • Vent A Hood, 60" Pro Wall Hood w/ 1200 cfm 4 blowers, stainless
  • Wolf 60" Dual Fuel Range - 6 Burners, Infrared Charbroiler and Infrared Griddle
  • Sub-Zero 36" Built-In Refrigerator and Freezer
  • Butcher block cutting board counter top by Foster Loven
  • Tile Crossville Speakeasy Zoot Suit AV282 in 12x36 from Louisville Tile, Nashville
  • Stainless Steel Backsplash from CommerceMetals.com
  • Counter TopsBianco River Silestone Quartz
  • Asko Stainless Dishwashers D5434XLS
  • Rock City Birdhouse from Rock City in Lookout Mountain, TN
  • Large Dough Bowl and Colorful Seed Chest were Flea Market finds in Lebanon, TN

Thanks, Brian and Greg!

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