Best Watering Cans: OXO, Hawes, Dramm & 6 More

Best Watering Cans: OXO, Hawes, Dramm & 6 More

4869fde91c29cc6f3cf9d7f4f31c7a27ab180469?w=240&h=240&fit=crop
Maxwell Ryan
Apr 14, 2015

I only have one watering can and it's very visible by my window so I want it to work really well, not drip and look fantastic. Here are all my top picks for the season with my personal choice on top: OXO's pour and store design works perfectly and its translucent color (3 colors) looks great. It has a large capacity and it extremely light when picking up. More below and what are YOURS???

(Image credit: Terrain)

Great shape. From Terrain, this vintage inspired can is made of solid brass and is on the petite side, making it perfect for sitting between potted plants when not in use.


(Image credit: Target)

Haws is sort of the gold standard for watering cans, and they come in many models. This one, at Target, is their classic smaller scale powder coated steel model "which has a tapered gracefully curved spout for accurate watering of pots and saucers." You can see the whole range here at Haws.co.uk.


(Image credit: Haws)
(Image credit: Haws)

These two cans, one from Amazon and one from Target, are both part of Haws plastic outdoor line, which is a great choice if you want a lighter, durable, softer on floors solution. "This is a well-designed, lightweight plastic watering can made with 2 handles for balance and effortless watering. The tall neck prevents water from spilling out when it is tipped forward. This is a general purpose can that comes with a plastic-backed oval brass rose and a right-angle downspout attachment for more precise watering in pots or planters."


(Image credit: Horne)
(Image credit: Horne)

For you modernists out there, the X3 is a dreamboat of powder coated steel made in the USA in a range of colors, including shiny brass and available at Horne. "Constructed using a single metal tube, bent three times (Get it?), to create both the handle and the pour spout and then soldered onto a metal can, the x3 is not only functional, but a thing of beauty."


(Image credit: Etsy)

This elegant, slender can from the 60's is an Etsy find. "Vintage Brass Garden Decor with Etched Asian Floral on both sides. Finely crafted. Hand engraved signature on the bottom, "Harilela's India 721"."


(Image credit: Dramm)

From Dramm in Wisconsin comes this simple injection molded plastic watering can in a bunch of colors at a great price. You can visit their site and see the whole line here.


(Image credit: GOODS)

Ok, this is for your contemporists and modern artsy types out there. An actually very practical can, the Spring holds half a gallon and is slim and super affordable. "Made of brightly colored polyethylene with a matte finish, this Dutch watering can was designed by Robert Bronwasser for Goods. The ergonomic design has a slender spout and a large opening for ease of filling with a faucet or hose."


(Image credit: Behrens)

Say you want just a plain, old fashioned shiny hot dipped steel watering can like you might find on a real farm. In that case Behrens would be your answer. Manufacturing in Minnesota since 1911, Behrens is the #1 supplier of steel containers in the U.S. and basically makes every steel bucket, tub or can you see.


(Image credit: IKEA)

Want the most designed, most colorful and least expensive option? Guess who? Yup, it's the Swedish Giant again with this classic design from 2002 that just won't stop. I overlooked it but, thankfully, you all in the comments wouldn't let it pass."The shape was extra important when I designed IKEA PS 2002 watering can. I wanted to give it an organic, fluid shape so it would harmonize with plants and running water. By using different templates I was able to sculpt a prototype that felt completely perfect. The final watering can has both a shape and color that make you want to have it out on display, instead of hidden away. And if you like, you can also use it as a vase."

Created with Sketch.