Black & White Works: High Contrast and Grayscale DIY Art That Won't Break the Bank

Black & White Works: High Contrast and Grayscale DIY Art That Won't Break the Bank

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Dabney Frake
Aug 11, 2016
(Image credit: West Elm)

Black and white art has timeless appeal and endless applications. When you take away the distraction of other colors, objects are reduced to their basic composition —the contrast is both complementary and compelling. It can be described as either elegant, daring, modern, graphic, bold, refined, classic, sophisticated, or minimalist. In other words, you just can't go wrong with this powerful combo.

(Image credit: West Elm)

Above, the geometric panels above were created by a stylist for West Elm's most recent catalog. Front + Main shares the ridiculously easy how to over on the site. (Also lead image.)

(Image credit: 55 Kvadrat)

The art in this Swedish home (for sale by 55 Kvadrat) is possible with just a sheet of plywood with black ink or paint applied unevenly with a cheesecloth.

(Image credit: Erin Francois)

If you're looking for something a little more relaxed and playful, last week Erin shared the way to make one of these vintage-style felt message boards, which are popping up as decor all over the place these days.

(Image credit: Earnest Home Co.)

Erin of Earnest Home Co. shows how to create a large watercolor that looks expensive instead of really easy.

(Image credit: Domino)

The Makerista (via Domino) shows how even non-artists can make one (or a series) of these Rorschach-inspired inkblot images.

(Image credit: Curbly)

This crosshatch art from Curbly is perhaps a little time-consuming, but doesn't take much else, other than a black Sharpie, straight edge and some patience. The results are A+ however.

(Image credit: Room for Tuesday)

This bold geometric art from Room for Tuesday looks like modern op art and is a great focal point over her mantel.

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