blogging Dwell Magazine: October 07'

blogging Dwell Magazine: October 07'

richele
Oct 2, 2007

This month's Dwell magazine celebrates their 7th birthday with a look back at just the idea of covering modern residential design and how the magazine has grown into a community of readers and living well including their own attempts at creating prefab homes and the issues that come along with all of those things.

As well as their look back this issue they also move forward with features on home design from Minneapolis, Houston and San Juan, Puerto Rico.

There were two other notable stories this month that shouldn't be missed The Condo Generation a story based here in our beloved Los Angeles and an extensive article and interview with photographer Julius Shulman [whom if you don't know the name - you haven't been paying attention for a very long time] who celebrates his 96th birthday this month.

The Condo Generation addresses a topic that all of the Los Angeles editors here at AT have long talked about - about how apartment living and condo living is just not respected in LA. When talking to someone in New York or San Francisco discussions about owning a co-op or TIC is something of note, a respected purchase - a sound investment. In Los Angeles, it's not looked at as fondly, everyone is still striving for the 3bed 2 bath with yard and fence. The fact is that purchasing a home in L.A. is simply out of reach for many first time home buyers.

The article goes on to discuss people choosing not to live in a single family tract home, but looking to a community within it's building, striving for great design and the interaction of families and individuals within a single building. Dwell goes on to even say that "Los Angeles is under a major change in the urban form from sprawling and horizontal to higher and denser". Could condo buying actually be getting some love and attention here? Let us know what you think.

And lastly a note about Julius Shulman's very lovely article looking back at 70 years of work and 70,000 negatives - with the soon-to-be publication of Modernism Rediscovered by Taschen. There were many wonderful parts to the article and interview, but the most notable that we learned was that Mr. Shulman was not a classicly trained photographer but someone who had a keen eye or what he calls "God-given" and a chance encounter with Richard Neutra who began his architectual photography career in 1936.

For any of our readers who think you need a proper degree to move forward with a dream we'll leave you with this bit of inspiration...

"At the end of February 1936, I'd been at UCLA, and then Berkeley, for seven years. Never graduated, never majored. Just audited classes. I was driving home from Berkeley" - Shulman hesitates dramatically "and I knew I could do anything. I was even thinking of getting a job in the parks department raking leaves, just so I could be outside. And within two weeks, I met Neutra, by chance. March 5, 1936 that day, I became a photographer. Why not?"

On newstands now.

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