Bloom House by Greg Lynn

Bloom House by Greg Lynn

Gregory Han
May 4, 2009

Contrast: pitting two oppositional values in direct correspondence to one another, is an effective technique of engaging the visual and tactile experience within a space. It is an organic vs. rectilinear contrast that is at the very core of Greg Lynn's Bloom House, an extension/experimentation of Lynn's previous Blobwall aesthetic into each room of an outwardly boxy-modernist Southern California beach house whose unique beauty is only revealed once entered...

Undulating, bulging, nearly pushing through interior walls, Lynn's interior is described as "weirdly moody" by the New York Times T Style Magazine...perhaps not surprisingly it doesn't seem all too strange to Southern Californian eyes where architecture like this, although nowhere run of the mill, isn't unwelcome or as otherworldly as our East Coast brethren seem to think of it (perhaps they've already forgotten the wonders of Saarinen's TWA terminal?).

Other corners of the first floor look like they have been snatched from a set for an old Steven Spielberg film: a vision of suburban calm infected by strange alien beings. A large boil grows out of the living room wall, its face sliced off to reveal a fireplace; the corner of a dining room wall swells to support a row of bookshelves.

The effect is at its best in the kitchen, where the atmosphere gets weirdly moody. Cabinets are made of molded white Corian, the material of choice among cutting-edge architects today. The blob-like legs of a kitchen island seem to have been made out of taffy...

Read the rest with more photos at Ahead of the Curve.

(Images: Raymond Meier)

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