Botanical Gardens Are Branching Out

Botanical Gardens Are Branching Out

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Cambria Bold
Jul 29, 2010

We recently received an email from the Brooklyn Botanic Garden alerting us to their Fall Class Schedule, and it went way beyond horticulture: instead, classes with names like "Fall Bird Migrations," "Photography at Dusk," "Composing in the City," "Pest Management," "Painting the Garden in Fall," and "Wild Edibles" made up the list. And so it goes for most botanical gardens around the country, according to The New York Times. Gardens are rebranding themselves to appeal to their visitors' interests in nature, sustainability, cooking, health, family and the arts.

People seem to be less interested in gardens per se, but more interested in the planet, and they're looking to botanic gardens to serve as a community leader and educator on issues like locally grown food, urban homesteading, and arts education. And most gardens are accepting that role and revamping themselves to meet the need. As Mary Pat Matheson, the executive director of the Atlanta Botanical Garden, says, "We're not just looking for gardeners anymore. We're looking for people who go to art museums and zoos."

Read the full article here.

Have you taken any classes at your local botanic garden? Tell us below.

(Image: Flickr member Oquendo licensed for use under Creative Commons)

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