Need a Place to Crash for a Few Hours? Try a Breather

Need a Place to Crash for a Few Hours? Try a Breather

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Nancy Mitchell
Nov 14, 2015
27 W 24th Street #700A, starting at $20/hr
(Image credit: Nancy Mitchell)
(Image credit: Breather)

Have you heard of Breather? It's a concept so ingenious I'm shocked that no one thought of it before. Here's how it works: if you happen to be in NYC (or Boston, or San Francisco) and need a quiet, private place to work, or meet with clients, or take a nap, or just chill out for a while, you can rent one of their beautifully appointed workspaces, located throughout the city, for however long you need it. After the jump, watch Breather Co-Founder, Caterina Rizzi talk about the workspace of the future .

A designer by trade, Caterina Rizzi has played a leading role in the successful creation and launch of international campaigns that engage people and create meaningful experiences for several notable retailers and brands.

As Breather's co-founder and Chief Creative Officer, Caterina is responsible creating the concept and curating the full experience for Breather, including designing the spaces, directing brand strategy, and much more.

This is one in a series of posts about design, co-working, and the future of how we work, inspired by our Maker Talk on June 12.

(Image credit: Nancy Mitchell)

Here's how it works: you use the Breather app to book a space, and a PIN code is sent to your phone to unlock the door. Spaces in New York start at $15 an hour, and can be booked anywhere from half an hour to a whole day. Each space has a work area, with a table and chairs (and wifi!) and a lounge area with places to sit and relax.

Breather HQ 1, starting at $19/hr
(Image credit: Nancy Mitchell)

Last week I had the opportunity to tour a few of Breather's New York spaces with some folks from their staff, including the designer responsible for creating the spaces. She said that the Breathers in each city have a slightly different feel, in keeping with each city's character. The New York Breathers, for example, have a minimal, industrial aesthetic, while the San Francisco ones have a softer, more layered feel.

You can click the links in the captions for information about the spaces pictured above, or head over to the Breather website to browse all their available spaces.

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