Confirmed: Robots Will Not Take Over Humanity (At Least Not in the Next 5 Years)

Confirmed: Robots Will Not Take Over Humanity (At Least Not in the Next 5 Years)

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Jennifer Hunter
May 5, 2015
(Image credit: Shutterstock)

Robots can already vacuum your floors, park your car and assemble your electronics, but according to Fast Company, the next big push in tech seems to be making these human helpers more accessible to the everyday person and, with some luck, keeping us living, breathing humans in charge.

The next five years is all set up for a huge leap forward in the world of robots according to several robotics developers from leading tech companies. They predict that we could start to see more and more robots interacting with us in our everyday lives very, very soon.

Whereas industrial robots have previously been too dangerous for the non-trained user, Kyle Lapham, Director of Laboratory Automation at Bay Area startup Counsyl says, "With the advent of smart sensors and control software...humans and robots will be able to safely coexist in a shared workspace." Reeeally. He predicts that certain tedious tasks like "Delivering prescriptions and meals to patients in hospitals or performing mobile security monitoring tasks," will be able to be covered by your friendly bot friends.

Another "gold rush" area of robotics? Rentals. Really! Jay McConville points out that in some industries —like farming —it will make more sense for robots to be simply rented out by farmers when they need certain tasks accomplished. No doubt it would increase quality of life and reduce costs for farmers to simply hire unmanned aircrafts to apply fertilizer to crops at certain intervals. And these experts fully expect that companies will begin to invest in robots solely for the rental market.

And what about artificial intelligence getting a little too intelligent? Robotics developer Hanns Tappeiner says that even though machines can learn and get better at certain tasks, it's not easy to translate that specific task to anything coming close to how a human brain can function. AT ALL. So, let's stop frustrating our rad robot developers and stop with the robot fear? Ehh?

Read more about the future of robotics at Fast Company.

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