You've Got This: 8 Baby Steps to Conquering Your Fear of Color

You've Got This: 8 Baby Steps to Conquering Your Fear of Color

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Julia Brenner
Aug 30, 2016
(Image credit: Bethany Nauert)

There are those who fearlessly embrace color, those who are ride-or-die neutral fans, and then there are the rest of us. We want to add color, but where? And how much? What if it's too much or looks terrible? *Deep breaths.* There are some low key, low commitment ways to ease into this business of adding color.

(Image credit: Best Friend For Frosting)

Accent pillows are probably the easiest, lowest commitment way to try out color. Since you're working small scale, you can also use pillows as a chance to try out bold patterns and bright hues, as shown in the above home tour from Best Friends For Frosting. (And if you're feeling really brave, mix up the patterns, too!)

(Image credit: Home Stratosphere )

This living room is a nice example of minimal greenery making a major color impact. Plants are always a sure bet in the attractive department: you can add them into your home at your own pace, and with proper care, they will add both beauty and health benefits.

(Image credit: Digsdigs)

Adding color through textiles, like a colorful bedspread, is another low-risk option. Have fun changing out bedspreads, pillows, and blankets seasonally, or give a potential wall or sofa color a test drive by implementing it into your home through textiles.

(Image credit: Marisa Vitale)

Open shelving provides a wonderful opportunity to take some risks with colors through accessories, dishes, books, frames, etc. I love the bright hues on this bookshelf featured in a recent House Tour and this is a great example of how little dashes of color are often all you need to get a color fix: a magenta chair might spook you but a small magenta storage box might be just the thing.

(Image credit: Julia Brenner)

If you happen across a large-scale piece of art or print and you absolutely love it, don't be afraid of how it will *work* in your home. The art you love will work because you will feel good every time you look at it. Follow your instincts with art; your heart knows what it wants.

(Image credit: BHG)

Adding color through furniture is more of a commitment and can be intimidating. You can't swap out a sofa as easily as you can swap out a bedspread. But starting small, for example bringing in a boldly colored side table, is a safer way to see how you like having a color around longterm. Maybe a red side table will be your gateway to a colorful sofa, or maybe it will be the confirmation you needed that colorful furniture = sensory overload for you.

(Image credit: West Elm)

When thinking about adding color through furniture, accent or dining chairs are another great option because you can opt for one or two if you don't want to commit to a full set. Have fun expanding your horizons and flexing your DIY skills (chairs are always available at thrift stores and garage sales) by revamping an old chair in a favorite color.

(Image credit: 1decor)

I've saved my favorite (and biggest commitment) way to add color for last. While not as permanent as paint, area rugs, like the rug featured here, are just as transformational in terms of setting the look and feel of a room. If you're nervous about bringing a bold large-scale rug into a central room, once again, start with a small area rug in your bedroom or entryway or try layering a smaller Persian over a neutral.

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