DIY 3 Ways: Storing Extension Cords in a Bucket

DIY 3 Ways: Storing Extension Cords in a Bucket

Eee058b3188ecfedf6381b6a529a2f4b360e8b3c?w=240&h=240&fit=crop
Taryn Williford
Aug 18, 2011

So you want an easy way to stash your errant extension cords? Well we have one question for you: How good are you at tackling DIY projects? We've got three different solutions for using a spare utility bucket to store your extra cords, each one with a different technique and, therefore, different difficulty level.

Grab a seat and a bucket; we're going to show you how to turn a basic plastic home-store 5-gallon pail into a lean, mean cord wrangling machine.

There's three ways to do it—so no matter what your skill level or attention span, you should be able to tackle one of these ways to coil your extra cords and keep then tangle free.



LEVEL 1: EASIEST
Just coil it into a bucket.

From: Real Simple
What you do: Drop one end of the cord into the bottom of the bucket, then slowly slide the rest inside in a coiled shape. That's it. The shape of the bucket will keep the cord in order and free of messy tangles.



LEVEL 2: STILL PRETTY EASY
Cut an access hole in the bottom of the bucket.

From: Ron Hazelton, Danny Lipford
What you do: It's basically the same as the "easiest" version, only you're going to drill a 1½-inch hole on one side at the bottom of the bucket. Slide the male end of the cord inside the bucket and through the hole to the outside. (There's videos here and here to get you going.) Anytime you need a little extension, just plug the cord from the hole into the wall and coil out as much wire as you need from the top opening of the bucket.



LEVEL 3: WHOA, REALLY?
Turn the bucket into a wicked cord-coiling machine.

From: Popular Mechanics
What you do: Create a complex amalgam of PVC pipe and plywood inside of a 5-gallon bucket. With various widths of PVC pipe, you'll create a vertical spinning axis to wrap your cord around—it sits on a metal turntable inside your bucket. It's like the hole-bucket solution on steroids. If you're interested, Popular Mechanics has the full project instructions here.


(Images: Popular Mechanics, Real Simple)

Created with Sketch.