Don't Forget These Design Truths

Don't Forget These Design Truths

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Jennifer Hunter
May 30, 2015

In your heart, you already know this stuff, but it's so easy to get caught up in a decor project, to get off track and to forget what is really important. That's what we're here for! Don't forget these basic truths that will truly make you feel so much happier at home.

There is no right way

No matter what anyone (yes, even Apartment Therapy) tells you, the right way to do something is the the way that you want to. End of story. Listening to knowledgable and reasonable suggestions can be helpful, but no one else can supersede what you know to be true about yourself and your home. Design accordingly.

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure

Fixing something that isn't working at home is key. Even better? Prevent potential problems before they happen. Know your tendency to clutter up any blank surface mere hours after a clean? Nip it in the bud by installing an organizational system right off the bat in a new space. Hate to vacuum? Implement a shoes-off policy to cut your work in half. There are always ways to get smarter about your space so you might as well do them first and save yourself the hassle.

People are more important than things

The things in your home are precious, but don't forget that the people in your home are more so! After all, you decorate so you and your family can enjoy your space and feel comfortable. Using your furnishings the way you want to —napping on that sofa, burning that sweet smelling candle, wearing your shoes all over your rug if you so choose — is the way to get the most mileage out of them! Maintain your nice things, sure, but don't preserve them to the point where you can't enjoy them.

Nothing is set in stone

Hate it? Change it! Sure, some improvements are more permanent than others, but you can always make an adjustment so take a risk! If you feel scared, start small with something like wall color or accessories which are a snap to switch out. Then try something else that feels a little scary. If you make a mistake, it's worth the (additional) money to fix it until it's right. Just call it a lesson learned.

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