Dump Your Decor: 4 Times to Say Goodbye

Dump Your Decor: 4 Times to Say Goodbye

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Jennifer Hunter
Jun 30, 2015

Breaking up is hard to do but if you've fallen out of love with an item in your home, it may be time to bite the bullet and end that relationship already. Here's our take as to when you should give your unloved pieces the heave ho and make room for something new in your life.

It's broken (and not worth a fix)

Putting in the time and expense to fix a broken piece of furniture needs careful consideration. When you weigh the costs/benefits, you may find that it's not really worth it. Saving something from the landfill is always an admirable idea, but you need to really be sure you're ready for the work. If not, it's okay to let it go. Try to think about ways you could salvage part of your piece (Do you love the knobs? Save them!) and reuse it for other projects.

Your style changed

You are always evolving and sometimes that means that things you previously loved just don't fit your esthetic anymore. That's just fine! You're allowed to switch it up anytime you want without guilt. If you've invested in a nice piece, it will still be nice for someone else so try to sell or give away your quality item. Maybe you can partially fund an upgrade to something that is more your current taste.

You never really liked it

If you've been using (and silently hating) something for a while, then what are you waiting for? Ditch it! Even if you paid good money for it! If it's not working for you for any reason, it's time for it to go. The things you use every day should be useful and make you happy. Keeping stuff around that you don't love is a waste of space and emotional energy.

It doesn't fit

Your things need to fit in your space, end of story. If you've moved or have just been making do with a thing that doesn't work in your home, it's time to let it go. Constantly walking around hulking armoires in a small space is no fun! If you need to save it for later — maybe it's an antique or a family heirloom — find a way to store it or loan it out to someone with more room, but cramming too-big items into your home won't help you. Your home is for living, not storing awkward items.

What else makes you ready to have the break-up talk?

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