Explore the Impact of Women on Midcentury Design at NMWA

Explore the Impact of Women on Midcentury Design at NMWA

0a14b8de7ba631b963ff91804092c04eef4a504f?auto=compress&w=240&h=240&fit=crop
Tara Bellucci
Oct 19, 2015
Eva Zeisel, Resilient Chair
(Image credit: Photo © The Museum of Modern Art / Licensed by SCALA/Art Resource, NY)

Midcentury design shows no signs of slowing in popularity. Explore the impact of women on the movement at National Museum of Women in the Arts' latest exhibit, Pathmakers: Women in Art, Craft, and Design, Midcentury and Today.

"For these mid-20th-century women, architecture and industrial design were essentially closed male societies. So they had to create their own professional pathways through ceramics, textiles and metals," said NMWA Director Susan Fisher Sterling. “The exhibition also highlights contemporary artists influenced by these taste-makers—women who are working today in the interstices between the useful object and conceptual aesthetics."

The exhibit features work from 40 artists including Ruth Asawa, Edith Heath, Sheila Hicks, Karen Karnes, Dorothy Liebes, Alice Kagawa Parrott, Lenore Tawney and Eva Zeisel. It runs from October 30, 2015 through February 28, 2016.

Created with Sketch.