The Best Paint Colors: 10 Farrow & Ball Not-Boring Neutrals

The Best Paint Colors: 10 Farrow & Ball Not-Boring Neutrals

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Nancy Mitchell
May 1, 2015
(Image credit: Nordic Design)

When you think of neutral paint colors, it may conjure up images of plain whites or boring beiges. But British paint purveyors Farrow & Ball have a whole slew of 'neutrals' — colors that will play well with others, and serve as a backdrop for other tints in the room — that are anything but boring. Here are ten of our favorites.

Above: Pink as neutral? Believe it. Farrow & Ball's Pink Ground, a pale, dusty pink, is the perfect backdrop for other, bolder hues.

(Image credit: House to Home)

This is Off Black, one of Farrow & Ball's original colors. It has a deep, charcoaly richness and just a little bit of softness, to keep things interesting.

Cornforth White is a warm gray that's anything but boring.

(Image credit: Farrow & Ball)

Pale Ammonite adds charm to a hallway.

This moody bathroom is painted in Hague Blue, a color that takes on slightly different qualities in every room it's in. It can read as navy, or brilliant blue, or even a bit greenish — definitely a color with a lot of personality.

This is the warm, beige-ish (almost sage, if you look at it right) French Gray.

(Image credit: Farrow & Ball)

This lovely, cool hue is Lamp Room Gray.

(Image credit: Farrow & Ball)

This bedroom is painted in the flat version of Railings No. 31, a black with undertones of blue.

(Image credit: Farrow & Ball)

Elephant's Breath is a warm gray...

(Image credit: Farrow & Ball)

that in the right lighting can read almost lavender. Isn't color fascinating?

For a moody look try Mole's Breath, a rich, brownish gray.

A quick note about color: as you may have noticed from some of the photos above, or from comparing the way these colors look in the rooms above to their online swatches, paint colors can change a lot depending on the lighting. So before you decide on paint colors, order swatches (or sample cans) and test them out in the space you want to paint, observing how the color changes throughout the day. Sometimes a color that's perfect in one room can be just not right in another, and you definitely want to know this before you paint.

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