Find the Perfect Office Chair Using Nontraditional Methods

How many times have you gone over the same routine when looking for an office chair? You either look in a catalog and order it, praying that it will feel ok and look good in your space. Or maybe you waste an entire day going to store to store, looking for the perfect chair. Both options have their perks but also their flaws. There are more perhaps more obscure options available to you, however, that can hopefully supplement your other avenues of searching.

The first is an astonishing new book out by Phaidon called A Taxonomy of Office Chairs. It is exactly as the title suggests, an analytic dissection of various office chairs and their history. Spanning from the 1840s to the present, you can objectively browse the greatest task chairs in existence. So whether you’re looking for a beautiful mid-century vintage Eames or a contemporary chair that looks like it just landed from outerspace, this book is your guide. There are over an astounding 400 illustrations to aid you in your search of finding the perfect chair. We would recommend consulting this first and narrowing down your selection for a few to go see in real life.

A second method to hunting down the perfect chair is to read reviews. We’ve found that when many people are looking for a new chair, they don’t spend much time reading reviews which is curious because we all read reviews for our tech gear but not so much for furniture. Some of our favorite reviews exist on YouTube, posted by a wide range of people from professional reviewing sources to first hand accounts from owners. If you’re looking for at least a semi-popular chair, there are bound to be some videos either explaining or reviewing it in depth. The benifits of watching YouTubes often means you get to not only see multiple angles of the chairs that sometimes the stock imagery doesn't show too well, but you also get to see people in them and interacting with them which can be extremely helpful when you're trying to get a sense of scale relation between the body and the chair.

[Image: Flickr member Josh Puetz licensed for use under Creative Commons.]