From Manure to Marigolds

From Manure to Marigolds

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Cambria Bold
Mar 2, 2009

"Cow poop is cow poop... Can't you guys do something with this stuff — make a flowerpot or something?" Uttered at a brainstorming meeting for Connecticut dairy farmers in 1998, those words inspired brothers Ben and Matthew Freund, second-generation dairy farmers, to begin work on a new manure-based business:

Why not grow flowers and tomatoes from cow manure?

After eight years in development, a $72,000 federal grant secured through Connecticut's Agricultural Businesses Cluster, and countless trial-and-errors, their biodegradable seed-starting containers — called CowPots — are being produced and sold to commercial and backyard growers all over the country...

What are CowPots? They consist of dried, deodorized manure fibers molded into pots. They hold water well, last for months in a greenhouse and can then be planted directly into the ground. The pots naturally decompose over time, continuing to fertilize the plant and attract beneficial worms.

Great idea!

Read the whole article at The New York Times.

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