Giving Birth At Home Isn't An Option For New Yorkers

Giving Birth At Home Isn't An Option For New Yorkers

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Sarah Rae Smith
May 17, 2010

Although you can do just about anything in New York City, the one thing you can't do — is legally deliver a baby at home under the care of a midwife. Sound outrageous? We think so, read on for more details on this recent development.

Due to a recent closing of St. Vincent's hospital in Manhattan which had a long history of supporting midwives, they no longer have the hospital backing they once did and are no longer legally allowed to deliver children at home. Here's what the Guardian had to say on the issue:

"The collapse of New York's legal home birth midwifery services has come as a result of the closure two weeks ago of one of the most progressive hospitals in the city, St Vincent's in Manhattan. When the bankrupt hospital shut its doors on 30 April the midwives suddenly found themselves without any backing or support.

There are 13 midwives who practice home births in New York, and under a system introduced in 1992 they are all obliged under state law to be approved by a hospital or obstetrician, on top of their professional training. St Vincent's was prepared to underwrite their services, but most other doctors and institutions are not, and they now find themselves without the paperwork they need to work lawfully."

Although, to some, giving birth at home is just about as appealing as going for a swim in Alaska in the middle of winter, for many, this age old process is one that is near and dear to their heart. Giving birth at home gives you privacy, comfort and control over many aspects that you lose when admitted to a hospital.

We're hoping to see a series of doctors or additional hospitals step up to the plate and give the Midwives of New York City (which sounds not unlike a Bravo TV show) the proper backing they need to continue their work especially with many patients already walking down the road to delivery.

Read the full story at the Guardian.

(via: guardian.co.uk)
(Image: Flickr member eyeliam licensed for use by Creative Commons)

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