Good Questions: Entryway Solution?

Pin it button big

Hello AT friends,

We own a brownstone in NYC, and are currently going through a home renovation. Although we are working with an architect, we cannot come up with a good solution for our entryway.

Specifically, when you open the front door, you enter the living space because the hallway wall has been removed. We like the fact that the wall has been taken down (our house is 18ft wide), but we would like some sense of separation. This can be permanent ( smaller wall, glass partition), or temporary. We have a contemporary styled home, but the architecture is decidedly classic.

Please help!!! Malaika

(Note: Include a pic of your problem and your question gets posted first.
Email questions and pics with QUESTIONS in subject line to:
editor(at)apartmenttherapy(dot)com)
Link To All Good Questions

Pin it button big
Pin it button big

Dear Malaika,

NICE HOUSE! wow. In answer to your question, this is tough one. You are better off with the wall gone, but the room really is still feeling the hallway going through it.

(Malaika, the pictures are a bit confusing. Is that the staircase leading up from the front door in the first and third pic? Is that the front door in the second pic? If so, how come the furniture is different? We could really use a floorplan here. Send one in and we'll attach it to this post.)

In any event, your best bet is DO IT WITH FURNITURE. You want to work against the long hallway-like effect that the house already has going for it by facing your furniture sideways, across the room. While 18" isn't much to play with when you are trying to get a hall and a living room in, you definitely want to use the back of your furniture to take the place of the wall that used to be there. Use the furniture to define the room in place of the wall.

The more you break up the long flow of your floor with perpendicular arrangements, the better the flow will become.

Anyone else??

You Might Also Like

Promoted Stories

Categories

Good Questions

Maxwell left teaching in 2001 to start Apartment Therapy as a design business helping people to make their homes more beautiful, organized AND healthy. The website started up in 2004 with the help of his brother, Oliver.