Great Vintage Camera Display at Defunct Levi’s Workshop

Tucked away on Wooster St in SoHo, the Levi’s Workshop lived for 3 short months. It was an open photography studio stocked with everything from vintage cameras to professional lighting equipment and backdrops, free to whoever happened to walk in. An idea this novel is probably worthy of some additional spotlighting but what we’re interested in at the moment is the unique (and beautiful) way the Workshop has decided to display their camera collection utilizing chalkboard paint and a quirky yet efficient labeling system. The Workshop had a brilliant solution to storing/displaying their vintage cameras. It was a particularly dubious challenge because the cameras themselves are available for rent so they needed to be visible and easily accessible. Their solution? Arrange the cameras on shelves (which happen to be made of beautiful reclaimed wooden beams) and paint the backdrop with chalkboard paint. Next, they drew a rough silhouette around each camera and labeled them accordingly. This way when more than one camera is checked out, each space remains reserved and it is easy to put the camera back in its proper place.

Although we don’t presume any of our readers will be running a rental service out of their house, this could still be a fun organizing solution instead of simply stuffing things in drawers. And why would this have to be used exclusively for cameras? We could see it as a home office setup with a ruler, stapler, phone, coffee mug, etc… Or, alternatively, you could use it in your home theater with your various remotes!

Returning back to the Levi’s Workshop, we thought the large drawing of the camera was a really great decorative element and is again, something easy to DIY in your own space. In your office we could see a large typewriter or maybe an old lamp diagram drawn out. Chalkboard paint is brilliant because you never have to worry about taking a risk because there are infinite "do-overs" so even for fun, go bold and see if it works out.

(1st & 4th Image: Flickr member Shawn Hoke Photography licensed for use under Creative Commons, the rest via psfk)

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