Green Ideas: Flow 2 The Living Kitchen

Green Ideas: Flow 2 The Living Kitchen

Range Govindan
Aug 21, 2009

Kitchens haven't changed that much in the last 50 years. Sure, some appliances have been updated, but most things remain the same. Can the kitchen as a whole be made more sustainable and productive? Isn't there a better way to do the things we have to do in order to eat? These are the questions addressed by the Flow 2 concept kitchen.

This living kitchen concept was created by Oregon designers John Arndt and Wonhee Jeong of Studio Gorm. They have designed a kitchen where waste products are used to grow plants. When you are drying dishes, the water goes to plants in terracotta containers. Food scraps and kitchen garbage are broken down by worms since up to 40% of household waste can be composted. This nets fertilizer which is used to feed the plants. A double-walled terracotta containers acts like a fridge since most foodstuffs don't actually need to be cooled down that much. It's cooled down as water evaporates through the outer wall. In this kitchen, nature and technology are integrated symbiotically.

The flow products can be used independently but are far more effective when they work in concert as part of the larger system. The individual objects are relatively uncomplicated, acting as simple vehicles for the more complex natural processes to do the work. This kitchen is developed as a flexible system where resources are reused by several elements creating a dynamic flow between the products. The flow kitchen focuses on three major problem areas in the kitchen Waste, Water and Energy.

This incredible project is part of an exhibition called Call and Response at the Museum of Contemporary Craft in Oregon. It will be on display until October 31. The only problem that we can think of is the smell. Creating compost and decomposing waste must not smell very good. The kitchen is usually a place that has to be very clean since food is prepared it in. We wonder how this can be managed. For sure, these ideas can be implemented by sections, ie leaving the compost outside.

[via Dezeen, Photos are by Wonhee Jeong and John Arndt]

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