Green Style: Felt Trends at ICFF

One of the oldest fabrics and certainly one that has a place in our heart (hours of kindergarten fun making wallets and hearts and letters), felt was all over the place at ICFF. And for good reason. It's moisture-resistant, renewable, tactile and inexpensive. A quick round-up of some of the things we saw after the jump...

We loved these acoustic panels from Anne Kyyro Quinn. Decorative and practical, they're a far cry from egg crates for soundproofing your home.

Felt also makes a great divider. It's sturdier than most fabrics and, because it doesn't unravel, it can handle intricate designs. We liked the versions from Shine Labs, in black and in white...

Another version from Stua, also in black and in white.

No longer "crafty," felt is modern and contemporary -- environmental, durable, easy care. Here, on the Section bench by Derek Chen of Council, it's both sleek and inviting.

Totes are durable and water-resistant when made of felt. They can be used for running errands, holding groceries as well as for corralling items from shoes to knitting to towels and magazines. We especially liked this one, the Akanbe from Plus-d. It's perfect for summer picnics, for the beach or for toting baby and kid stuff; we love how it unfolds to become a blanket or play mat.

Did you know felt absorbs the formaldehyde often found in cheaper building materials and then breaks it down? Renters might want to keep that in mind and consider it to cover walls or floors. These puzzle pieces from Graf & Lantz stick to walls and floors. Use them to cover an entire surface or to add a bit of visual interest.

Graf & Lantz also makes pillows and ottomans. The neutral colors and simple designs work in both modern and traditional rooms.

Felt bowls can hold mail, fruit, knitting or other items. Graf & Lantz makes a version; the one from Etecetra Goods is fashioned from felt by Filzfelt of Massachusetts, whose felt is matched to the Pantone color system.

>>Via Abby in LA