Greenpeace Releases Eco Report for Top 18 Gadget Companies

Greenpeace Releases Eco Report for Top 18 Gadget Companies

Sonia Zjawinski
Jun 26, 2008

Eek! As if we all needed more tech guilt, now Greenpeace comes out with its list who the worst eco offenders in the gadget world. Nintendo bottoms out the list -- Wii-ACK -- because of a 6 percent increase in CO2 emissions due to increased demand. Who kicked green ass after the jump...

Apple is 11th, because all new models of iMac and the MacBook Air have bromine-free casings and printed circuit board laminates as well as PVC-free internal cables, millions of iPods now have bromine-free enclosures and printed circuit board laminates, plus the MacBook Air has mercury free LCD display with arsenic-free glass. It also scores top marks for all desktops computers, portable PCs and displays complying with Energy Star 4.0 and their iPod and iPhone power adapters not only exceeding the Energy Star standard, but already meeting California's stricter efficiency regulations that take effect 1 July 2008.

Sony Ericsson is at the top of the pack, thanks to phasing out toxic chemicals.

Greenpeace has been ranking the top 18 companies
since August 2006, every three months, in the hopes of pressuring them to do more to make their products green. Ideally Greenpeace wants the companies to:


  • Clean up their products by eliminating hazardous substances.

  • Takeback and recycle their products responsibly once they become obsolete.

  • Reduce the climate impacts of their operations and products.

What we'd like to see are ratings on consumer electronic packaging that let us know how much damage said product did during and after its manufacturing (was it made using solar power, what percentage of its components are recyclable, are any of its parts toxic?)

Wal-Mart did something similar last spring when it implemented its green scorecard -- information on its vendor's products that rate the greenhouse gas emissions related to production, materials used, product to packaging ratio, recycled content usage, amount of renewable energy used to manufacture the packaging, and the recovery value of the raw materials and emissions related to transportation of the packaging materials.

Image: Greenpeace

Created with Sketch.