Handmade Toy Legislation Delayed
Tammy Everts
Feb 2, 2009

Here's some good news to start the week: the new Consumer Product Safety Commission legislation that would have driven countless small toymakers out of business on February 10th, has been delayed for one year. Called a "time out" by Commissioner Nancy Nord, the delay will give toymakers a chance to bolster their arguments as to why they need to remain exempt from prohibitively expensive (one estimate puts the cost at $4,000 per toy) safety testing and certification.

What prompted the Commission to grant the delay? Public outcry from people like you. Keep reading to find out what this all means.

This stay of enforcement does not mean toymakers are out of the woods yet, and it still requires -- rightfully, we might add -- that toys conform to mandatory standards:

Significant to makers of children's products, the vote by the Commission provides limited relief from the testing and certification requirements which go into effect on February 10, 2009 for new total lead content limits (600 ppm), phthalates limits for certain products (1000 ppm), and mandatory toy standards, among other things. Manufacturers and importers -- large and small -- of children's products will not need to test or certify to these new requirements, but will need to meet the lead and phthalates limits, mandatory toy standards and other requirements.

The decision by the Commission gives the staff more time to finalize four proposed rules which could relieve certain materials and products from lead testing and to issue more guidance on when testing is required and how it is to be conducted.

Hopefully this situation resolves with legislation that keeps our children safe and is workable for toymakers. We'll keep you posted.

More reading:

:: The CPSC news release announcing the stay of enforcement
:: Previous posts on Ohdeedoh regarding the legislation: New Legislation Threatens Independent Toymakers and 9 Toys You May Not Be Allowed to Buy After February 10th

Via Cool Mom Picks

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