Holmes Wilson: Designer

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Holmes Wilson makes tables to be reckoned with.

While their sturdy construction suggests commercial use, Pamela Holmes' and Brad Wilson's chunky concrete-topped coffee tables, consoles, coffee and dining tables have been discovered for residences as well, probably as a result of the craze for poured concrete surfaces in kitchens and bathrooms.

Holmes Wilson's work is a study in the constrast of materials: wood and concrete. The tops, which are made from heavy slabs of glass-fiber reinforced concrete seem to hover over lighter and generally more sculpted wooden bases (ah, the magic of hidden steel reinforcements).Not unlike the tables of Peter Sandback, these are weighty pieces of furniture, but they feel both much more serious and Northern California to us, probably because of the absence of visible steel and the more more somber, organic color palette.

Most of these tables work indoors or out due to sealed, waxed surfaces that resist cracking and stains. The slab tops can be fashioned in white, black, lichen, or limestone colorways. Bases are made from maple, black walnut, cypress, or Green woods like Chi Chi Pape and oldgrowth reclaimed redwood.

The Tree Table ($4,200), pictured above left, works indoors or out (and we can actually think of a few dinner parties that would benefit from a tree sticking up through the middle of the table). The top can be separated into two half rounds and re-assembled around a tree. The base is made from reclaimed old growth redwood.

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The Poppy Table ($2,600 - $2,800) has a base made of 2" thick wood slab. The design lends itself to dining with a crowd because of the overhangs.

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This example of Holmes Wilson's Live Console design is $2,200 and is made with black concrete, steel and a base of Nakashima-esque sculpted black walnut.

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The Oyster Coffee Table is a 48" square of walnut and concrete and costs $2,000.

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The Cone Table is one of Holmes Wilson's best sellers. It has a MCM feeling courtesy of Prouvé-inspired splayed legs. The heavy slab is supported by a 33" round steel disc.

Holmes Wilson tables can be seen at The Gardener in Berkeley or Healdsburg and ordered directly through the duo's website.

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