Home Theater Features HDTV That Fits Flush

We've seen some tidy home entertainment centers, but this one is a really interesting one, mainly because it makes the HDTV fit flush with the front end of the furniture. That keeps things nice and clean, and if you want to know how you can make your own, read on to find out more.

Pin it button big

This surprising hack comes thanks to Jerome Samson, from Paris, France, who's had the same question crop up over and over: how did he find a TV that perfectly fit into a Besta? The short answer is that he modified the doors to create a custom cover and mounted the HDTV inside the IKEA Besta in order to make things fit flush in this unique home entertainment center.

They started out by selecting a shelving unit. In this case, an IKEA Besta was used, but any similar entertainment center shelving unit will do. Instead of going with sliding doors, Jerome used doors with hinges, that were cut to size. He also wanted to have easy access to the back of the TV in case he needed to change things.

Pin it button big

He used a 2/3rd-inch-thick plywood sheet to hold the TV sheet. Holes were added for venting purposes and cable access. Once the Besta was installed, it's time to mount the TV on the custom plywood sheet. The doors were cut to match the set, using a jigsaw. He finished it off with a hand-held router and a metallic ruler as a guide. Then, he added some black liner to complete it.

This is definitely a good look to have if you want to keep things simple and minimal at home. The cables and devices are all hidden away, which is nice. Possible options would include adding a cooling fan or two in order to ensure that the tech doesn't overheat. This custom mount is also a prime location to put in some LEDs. They will add a nice glow to the overall structure, and since it's basically hidden away behind the HDTV already, it will give a good ambient glow.

Pin it button big

Other options would include customizing the enclosure further to allow gesture-based video games, like the Wii and Kinect, to be also hidden away while still functioning with the doors closed. This would entail drilling some holes and cutting into the doors once again.

[via Ikeahacker, photos by Jerome Samson]

2 Comments