How One Designer Transformed A Mish-Moshy Home...For Herself

How One Designer Transformed A Mish-Moshy Home...For Herself

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Arlyn Hernandez
Aug 22, 2016
(Image credit: Jérôme Labrecque )

Interior designers are wired a certain way. They can walk into a home in need of some tender love and instantaneously envision what it should look like it. Such is the case with this mish-moshy home owned and resurrected by Karyne Beauregard. What once was a bad marriage of dated materials and haphazardly added contemporary "fixes" is now a cohesive, modern dream.

Take a look at the home before Karen started work on it:

Though the open floor plan of the space lent itself to good flow, heavy furnishings and overwhelming decor choices made the spacious living areas seem smaller than they really are.

From Karyne:

This townhouse in Montréal's Rosemont sector had an interior that dated to the building's construction in 2000. As its owner, and an interior designer myself, I embarked on a major construction project of enlarging and completely renovating the space.

This family home was completely transformed based on the history of its neighborhood. Raw materials such as steel echo the CPR Angus Shops, an industrial complex for fabricating railway rolling stock that has now been lost to history.

The kitchen, located on the ground floor, is adjacent to the dining room, which opens on an entrance with an ethanol fireplace set into a partition combining steel and wood. A hint of color introduced by the console heightens and links the various functions of the floor.

The existing stairway was replaced with a bleached-maple staircase highlighted by a custom white-steel handrail. An architectural effect was created by the black of the central walls, providing depth and structure overall. The living room is the ideal location for family entertainment with its custom-made sectional sofa and rocking chair, which is a favorite piece of mine. Moreover, I am proud that nearly all the items in the decor were made in Canada, as I am committed to buying locally.

Drawing my inspiration from the railway, I came up with the idea of using a container door as a partition between the toilet and the rest of main bathroom. It's such an astonishing feature that creates a truly unique design while making strategic use of recycling! Raw materials such as the black concrete wall, the intricately patterned concrete floor tile, and wood merge marvelously to create an atmosphere of originality without setting aside functionality.

I can now state that the challenge of renovating this house has been
met: everything is in its place and each place fits into a totally designed setting integrated into its overall environment.

Here's what Karyne's lovely, renovated home looks like now:

(Image credit: Jérôme Labrecque )

Karyne opened up the old coat closet to allow for more space in the entry. Built ins create plenty of storage, and a mirror bounces around light (and offers a last glance out the door.)

(Image credit: Jérôme Labrecque )

The glass surround of the fireplace imbedded into the wall separating the entrance and the dining room allows the unobtrusive feature to float.

(Image credit: Jérôme Labrecque )
(Image credit: Jérôme Labrecque )

The black accent wall is painted in Benjamin Moore's Black Panther. The ceilings and walls throughout are the super crisp Decorator's White by Benjamin Moore.

(Image credit: Jérôme Labrecque )

A sizable island is the command center for the fully renovated kitchen. An herb wall adds greenery and life to the modern space.

(Image credit: Jérôme Labrecque )
(Image credit: Jérôme Labrecque )

A peek at the recycled container door in the bathroom. Patterned floors liven up the black, white and wood-tone palette.

From Karyne:

"I was looking for a distinctive element to add to the bathroom. In search for inspiration, I looked at pictures of a trip I had taken to France and I came across a photo of a kiosk that had a white painted container element to it. I loved the idea and decided to use a maritime container door as a wall in my bathroom. The day after I concepted the idea, I set out to confirm the feasibility of it, in terms of dimensions, weight and availability."

(Image credit: Jérôme Labrecque )

A built-in window seat allows for tons of surrounding storage in the bedroom.

(Image credit: Jérôme Labrecque )

Thanks so much for sharing your home with us Karyne!

Project by: Karyne Beauregard of Entre 4 murs

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