Privacy, Please: Ideas for Carving Out a Cozy Bedroom in a Studio

Privacy, Please: Ideas for Carving Out a Cozy Bedroom in a Studio

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Katie Holdefehr
Feb 9, 2017
(Image credit: Ellie Koleen )

The challenge: Create a "bedroom" (well, at least a bed nook) in an open-layout studio apartment. Our solution: Choose visual dividers that separate the space, but that don't block sunlight or cut up the square footage of an already tiny home. Presto—your single room will suddenly feel like two (or more.)

Here are 11 simple and smart ideas to inspire small-space dwellers:

Above: To visually divide the bedroom from the rest of her open-layout loft featured on Design*Sponge, graphic designer Jess Levitz built a platform for her bed, complete with stairs and sheer curtains for privacy. An added bonus: The cubbies beneath the bed serve as extra storage for her record collection.

(Image credit: Planete Deco)

Even when open, a curtain has the effect of sectioning off the cozy bed from the rest of this studio from Planete Deco. The tall white armoire acts as a large visual barrier between the bedroom and the sitting area.

By strategically placing a necessary support beam to separate the bed from the main area of the home, the owners of this adorable shed earned the bedroom a sense of privacy, without closing it off entirely.

By partitioning the bed from the living room with a paned glass wall, this Swedish apartment on My Scandinavian Home gains a bedroom without cutting up the square footage.

(Image credit: BRSPEC)

Turn a walk-in closet into a "sleep-in" closet by buying a bed small enough to fit snugly into the alcove, as shown in the Swedish apartment above listed on the realty site BRSPEC. Replacing the doors with a semi-sheet curtain allows for privacy, while preventing it from feeling claustrophobic.

(Image credit: Design*Sponge)

Consider choosing long, low furniture as a room divider. The dresser in this studio seen on Design*Sponge doesn't block the window, allowing sunlight to flood the small space, but it keeps the bed hidden from the sitting area on the other side of the room.

(Image credit: Sköna Hem)

Garment racks are all the rage right now, so if you have one, why not put it to work as a divider between your bed and living room? Sköna Hem fashioned theirs by suspending a lucite bar from the ceiling, but a store-bought free-standing garment rack can serve the same purpose.

(Image credit: IKEA)

Even if you don't like the look of an exposed wardrobe, you can still make use of a clothing rack. IKEA used the PORTIS rack as a plant stand to visually separate areas for sleeping and studying.

(Image credit: VTWonen)

The stylists at vtwonen used an oversized armoire to conceal the bed in a lofty home with a vaulted ceiling. Turning the bed away from the rest of the space will give sleepers the feeling that they're in another room.

(Image credit: Style and Create)

A large area rug helps visually separate the sitting area from the sleeping nook, while a pastel color palette unifies this serene Gothenburg apartment spotted on Style and Create.

(Image credit: Small Cool contest entry)

In Stacey's sunny studio, an entry from our Small Cool 2015, contest a row of hanging plants creates a veil of greenery, while a couch turned to face the other direction takes over where the vines trail off.

(Image credit: Ennui via My Scandinavian Home; BRSPEC)
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