Three Design Elements That Can Take a Home From Good to Excellent

Three Design Elements That Can Take a Home From Good to Excellent

A9b2474af14a5589cafb224b56c68b0f68a1fbad?w=240&h=240&fit=crop
Adrienne Breaux
May 9, 2016
(Image credit: Esteban Cortez)

Whether your job calls for creativity or not, many of us wish we felt more inspired and creative on a daily basis for personal projects, hobbies and home decor ideas. There are things you can add to your home or work space to make it more creatively motivating (and nope, it doesn't matter whether the space is tiny or expansive). These elements can take a home from good to excellent.

(Image credit: Esteban Cortez)

A mix of unique things you love (weird, found, bought or made)

It should be no secret that filling your home or work space with what you love—things that make you laugh, items you think are quirky, objects with epic origins—make a place feel personal. But these tokens you pick up along the journey of life do more than just decorate your home, they imbue your space with stories and energy. These stories can fuel your creativity when you need inspiration (for any kind of project). This energy makes a home burst with personality.

(Image credit: Esteban Cortez)

A mix of openness and cozy nooks

In my opinion, an inspiring space is one that includes a mix of both "airiness" and cozy nooks. Sometimes you need an open space when you're feeling stuck on a creative problem. Other times, you might crave the physical safety that a cozy nook can provide when you're stressed. Having a mix of both in your home can make sure you're inspired no matter your mood and create layers of comfort throughout.

As shown in Hannah's studio above, you don't need a big space to carve out both airiness or cozy nooks. A slightly translucent room divider creates both a wall to anchor a home office and a bedroom nook, while helping to keep furniture out of the center of the studio, which helps the space feel open.

(Image credit: Esteban Cortez)

Tactile textures and playful patterns

Stimulus leads to creativity, excitement and the desire to interact with your space. Color, leafy plants, pattern (as shown below) can all stimulate you visually. But tactile textures are important, too. By layering different textures on top of each other, you stimulate both your visual and touch senses. I believe this kind of layering can lead to supportive, inspiring, excellent environments.

(Image credit: Esteban Cortez)

See more of Hannah's gorgeous (and yes, inspiring!) studio home in her house tour → Hannah's Inspiring Oakland Studio (With 40 Plants & Counting!)

Created with Sketch.