How To Get the Tudor Style of Wolf Hall (But With a Modern Twist)

How To Get the Tudor Style of Wolf Hall (But With a Modern Twist)

48e39e4b77bc91890dad6e882ab3235b85d24bc1?w=240&h=240&fit=crop
Dabney Frake
Jun 10, 2015
(Image credit: PBS)

If you love the dark and brooding feel of the BBC’s Wolf Hall, there’s no need to scamper off to England and live in an old Tudor mansion. Elements of that style have stuck around through the ages, and you can get the new traditional flavor of the time period with a few design elements that feel elegant and stately — without the need to forgo electricity and heated rooms.

Wood Paneling

(Image credit: House & Home)

Some people love a good wood paneled wall; others can’t stand it. You can lighten it with white paint, like this bright space from House & Home.

(Image credit: Chris Loves Julia)

...or update the look by painting it a deep moody shade (like black) that's very on trend. Chris Loves Julia recreated a similar look with a DIY wainscoting.

Iron Fixtures

(Image credit: Jessica Helgerson)

Jessica Helgerson used a sleeker, modern take on heavy Medieval circular metal chandeliers for this house in Portland. As seen in Lonny.

(Image credit: Burnham Designs)

Burnham Design used the material sparingly in this Beverly Hills Tudor redesign, with a lantern shaped lighting fixture in the hallway.

Elaborate Wallpaper

(Image credit: Hacin & Associates)

This mock Tudor home designed by Hacin and Associates respects the history of the building, but is still able to make it fresh and modern. The wallpaper on the ceiling nods to traditional Tudor ornate designs, but the updated pattern and ceiling placement places it firmly in today’s world.

Vaulted, Timbered Ceilings

(Image credit: Delco Construction)

The beams on these high ceilings from Delco Construction were painted white to make it modern, but the Tudor influence is unmistakable.

(Image credit: Tiny House Swoon)

And lest you think this look is only for grand estates, this house from Tiny House Swoon shows that even tiny homes can adopt elements reminiscent of the period. The high peaked ceiling and timber beams work just as well.

Stone Fireplaces

(Image credit: Architectural Digest)

Ornate carved fireplaces were focal points of Tudor spaces and an important feature of common areas. This living room from Architectural Digest is a brighter, updated version of expansive great halls of the past.

(Image credit: Kristina Wolf)

Designer Kristina Wolf paired an architecturally significant Tudor-style mantel with eclectic furniture and decor.

Created with Sketch.