How To: Make a Reclaimed Wood Table and Bench

How To: Make a Reclaimed Wood Table and Bench

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Maxwell Ryan
Sep 14, 2009

Title: Reclaimed wood table and bench
Name: Ted Gore
Time: 2 weekends
Cost: approx $75 for wood, $200 for legs (depends on the legs you get), $10-15 for hardware

This project is a bit bigger than most, but totally doable in two weekends! Click above for the pics and head below for all the instructions...


DURING

TOOLS:

• 1X6 wood planks from a reclaimed lumber yard, drill (for drilling and screwing), table saw and mitre saw (cutting can be done by a mill shop for a cost), wood screws.

STEPS:

Table:

• 1x6 planks are cut to length (52" for this table). Planks are cut long ways to make them 1x3, then cut again to varying lengths in sets of 6 to be mismatched for a butcher block type look. Keep the sets together so over all length when mis-matched stays at 52".

• Lay the planks out on the floor to plan where they all go and to get the desired mis-match pattern.

• Leave several planks at full length for strength reasons. I used about 5 or 6 at full length.

• Row by row, start screwing on length of boards to the next length. Spread the full length boards out evenly through the stack for consistent strength. This can be done so that the first strip will have no holes in it on the visible side. The last strip of boards you screw in will have holes left over. I used a counter sink drill bit to create a hole for a dowel. For all of the screws, drill a hole first, then drive the screw. (See diagram)

• The bottom will need to be braced perpendicular to the boards to add lateral strength. I had the the ends of these pieces of wood cut off at an angle for aesthetic appeal. (See picture)

• Measure the placement of the legs for even distribution, and use washers to gain consistent height from leg to leg if your legs you use don't have levelers. I used legs from hairpinlegs.com. *Note: you may need to drill new holes in the base plates for the legs to get proper alignment for drilling into a plank and not through a space between two planks, or close to the edge of a plank where the hold will be weak. (See the picture)

• You have the option of sanding everything down to knock loose in any splintered wood, but don't sand too much! You'll loose the roughness of the reclaimed wood. I also put a coat of poly on everything.

Bench:

• Basically the same exact thing as the table except I didn't cut down the boards to 1X3. I left them 1X6. Up to you!

Resources:

Pretty much just the reclaimed lumber yard. If you are in the LA area I used The Reclaimer in Burbank.

Originally published 2009-02-20 - CB

More posts in Do it Now! The February Jumpstart Contest 2009 - Re-Nest
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