How To: Make a Vinyl Bowl

A little bit ago we wrote about some super groovy vinyl bowls that were for sale at Given. A lot of the comments were about making your own vinyl bowl, so we decided to give it a shot. Well, we're hooked. Here's a How To guide so you can get hooked too!

First off, find a record with a cool label. Bonus points if you can score a clear or colored record.

Get a metal (or glass) bowl that's a little bit smaller than the record. Make sure you're happy with the size of the bowl, because once your record warps into it it'll be roughly the same dimension.

Get a can of something. The can is placed on the center of the record (we'll get to that) to help put weight on it so it shapes into the bowl.

We set our oven for 200 degrees, but we've heard some people go as high as 250.

Place the record on top of the bowl. Make sure it's centered so that it shapes into the bowl evenly.

(sorry it's so dark) Place the can on top of the record.

Now we wait. We typically check every three minutes or so. It'll start to morph around the five minute mark. If you set your oven to 200 degrees it's not going to be hot enough for the vinyl to melt (that would be bad). Just keep checking in on it. It'll eventually start to sink into the bowl. If you're unhappy with the shape it's taking, poke it a bit with a metal spatula (or something like that). After about ten minutes you should take it out of the oven.

The vinyl cools pretty quickly, so once it's out of the oven the shape is pretty much set. However, if you're unhappy with your shape you can easily just put it back in the oven (but we recommend letting the bowl cool down first) and try again.

Hooray! A fun new bowl for you or a friend.

We're going to use ours on our bedside table to store jewelry that we forget to take off before we hop into bed.

Additional notes:

1. If possible, keep all nearby windows open. The fumes can be a bit overwhelming.
2. Vinyl is in no way food safe. These types of bowls should not house food items of any kind (even dried food).
3. Each oven is different, but we've never met someone who needed to set their oven above 250 degrees.