Mandatory "Me Time": How to Make Room for Your Hobbies on the Weekend

Mandatory "Me Time": How to Make Room for Your Hobbies on the Weekend

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Marlen Komar
Feb 23, 2017

If you're lucky, your weekends are designated "me time." Those are the days you get to unwind from work and delve into hobbies, passions, or side projects that take us out of the daily grind and let us flex our interests and creativity.

But, you know, sometimes life gets in the way. You were supposed to practice with that fancy new camera lens you bought, but then a mountain of laundry beckoned. Or maybe you were going to finally start those Italian lessons, but then a friend asked if you could help them move.

There's always going to be something that pops up during the weekends, but the trick is to make your side project time non-negotiable. Rather than giving away your hours because of guilt or necessity and then feeling bummed you had no "me time," here are a few sure-fire ways that will make room for your hobbies on the weekends.

Schedule It

It might sound rigid, but if you use a daily planner regularly or an app on your phone, then you probably know that if an appointment is made it's basically set in stone. If the time is marked, you'll show up to it. Following that logic then, if you see "yoga" or "beer brewing" on your Saturday afternoon schedule, you'll be more likely to actually do it. Since it's already blocked off in your calendar, you'll have a smaller chance of giving that spot away to a brunch with friends or a quick nip to the laundromat.

Set Yourself Weekly Goals

It can be super easy to be diligent with your hobby one week, and then put it off for two more because things came up. What you need to do is find a way to make your me-time a priority. A great way to do that is to set yourself weekly goals so you have something to strive for.

For example, say your hobby is writing. If you have a goal of writing one chapter per weekend (or one poem, or one pitch,) then you'll be more likely to sit down at the computer and do it. You can make it more specific – maybe the first Sunday of the week you'll write a chapter, and then the next weekend you'll look up editors you want to pitch to, and the weekend after that you'll read articles on how to properly write out a pitch. Having action steps mapped out for the month will help you motivated to continue on with your goals.

Think Of It As Play Time

Rather than making it another thing to check off your list, reframe your hobby as "play time." See it as a break from the usual rotation of chores, errands, and obligatory hangouts, and use your hobby time almost like recess: This is the part of the weekend you've been waiting for. The part that puts your interests front and center, and has no other purpose than to let you enjoy something for an hour or two. If you reframe your hobby that way, then not only will you look forward to it all week, but you won't feel guilty for indulging. It's not time away from cleaning your house or hanging out with your partner- it's self-care.

Do It In The Morning

If you find yourself easily bogged down by commitments or out-of-the-blue emergencies, try tackling your hobby during the mornings. While everyone is still waking up and moving slowly, you can get a jump start and sit down with your blog, your camera, or your book club selection, and tackle your me-time before noon hits. If you get it out of the way first thing in the morning, you won't have any excuses for not doing it.

Have A "Short Version" Ready For Busy Weekends

Rather than just hitting pause on your interests when the weekend gets busy, have a "short version" ready of your hobby for when schedules get hectic. For example, if you enjoy doing yoga, swap your usual 45 minute session for a quick 15 minute one on YouTube. Or if you love to bake on the weekends, try a recipe that uses five ingredients and takes 30 minutes to bang out, rather than picking one out of the fancy French cookbook that's meant to take half the afternoon. That way you can still enjoy your interests and tackle everything on your hectic to-do list.

Block Out Recurring "Me Time" for the Future

Open up your planner right now, and every 1 PM on every Saturday for the next year, block off an hour with the words "me time." That way, no matter who asks you to lunch, to volunteer, or to help you with moving, you'll know that you're already booked. It'll help you manage your time, but it also establishes a routine for you and your hobby that will help you accept it as a permanent part of your life: Every Saturday at one o'clock, you do it. After a month or two, it'll feel like a natural part of the weekend.

Announce It To Your Friends

If your friends (or partner) have a habit of springing plans up on you during the weekend, make a habit out of announcing that you need time for your hobby. So if they want to go to the beach or a flea market or get lunch, always respond with, "Well, I have my guitar lessons at two every Saturday," or "maybe after my photo editing session at one." By reinforcing that you have this weekly task that you make time for, they'll begin to respect that time slot and not try to take it over. And even better—you'll respect it more, too. By announcing it to others you're making it a permanent part of your weekend, which will only make you take it more seriously.

Sometimes responsibilities get in the way, and making room for personal hobbies or side-projects can get tricky. But follow some of these tips and your passions will have at least a fighting chance!

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