How To Pack Things That Are Flammable

How To Pack Things That Are Flammable

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Sarah Rae Smith
Nov 5, 2008

We have a pair of oil lamps for power outages (thank you unpredictable Midwest weather). We happen to love their vintage color and since they are a necessity in this neck of the woods, it's nice to have some that can actually sit out on display.

The time has come in our stages of packing to move that they need a box, bag or carton to get packed into.

But due to their flammable nature they aren't something that can get tossed into any random box. Click through to see how to move these potentially dangerous items along with a list of things that are technically illegal to move if you use a moving service.

Doing your own move across country, state or city can be a daunting task. So if you choose to use a moving company you might want to be aware of some things that aren't allowed to be packed and stowed due to the fire hazard that they create. Some are things that most people wouldn't dream about packing, but there are a few that might not be on your radar. Check out the list below:

  • Acid
  • Sterno
  • Darkroom Chemicals
  • Pesticides
  • Motor Oil
  • Gasoline
  • Charcoal
  • Lighter Fluid
  • Fertilizer
  • Paints
  • Car Batteries
  • Matches
  • Nail Polish & Remover
  • Ammunition
  • Liquid Bleach
  • Aerosols
  • Kerosene
  • Pool Chemicals
  • Chemistry Sets
  • Fireworks
  • Motor Oil
  • Paint Thinner
  • Batteries
  • Loaded Weapons
  • Weed Killer
  • Ammonia
  • Lamp Oil
  • Propane
  • Cleaning Fluid

    Our oil lamps will have the royal treatment when it comes to packing. They will be drained, washed and packed in bubble wrap before being stowed away for the move. You might think that just stashing them in the backseat while you drive will be ok, but take it from someone who's attempted such silly behavior before, it's a less than stellar idea (They had to get home from auction somehow!).

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