How to Layout 4 Tricky Bedroom Floorplans with Two Twin Beds

How to Layout 4 Tricky Bedroom Floorplans with Two Twin Beds

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Eleanor Büsing
Sep 27, 2017
(Image credit: Apartment Therapy )

We spend approximately one third of our lives sleeping, so it goes without saying that our bedrooms are an important room in our homes. They're also storage areas and often working spaces as well, creating layout issues. Furthermore, not every size and style of bed works for every lifestyle, and neither do they necessarily work with the space in our homes. In this series, we'll be exploring layout options for different bed sizes within various-shaped bedrooms. Here, we're tackling the design conundrum of what to do with two twin beds.

Perfect for young siblings sharing or a versatile guest room, there's something downright lovely about a room with two twin beds. But double the style is often double the trouble—not all rooms allow for a traditionally symmetrical layout, and two sleepers often means two bedside tables, two chests of drawers, two desks, etc.

Square

A great shape for a queen or double bed, a square bedroom can feel a bit cramped with two twins. Here, the problem is helped by a shared central chest of drawers, making it a tallboy helps with storage and privacy. On the other side of the room, an extra-long desk or wardrobe works for both inhabitants of the room. Add in two compact side tables, and this room has everything it needs to function (and look great).

Long and Narrow

This is a great bedroom type for twin beds, as the proportions mimic that of the beds themselves, and there's space to spread out. Placing the beds lengthwise as daybeds makes the best use of the floor space, and allows a pleasing symmetrical layout. Put an extra table in between the beds, or make this a chest of drawers or an open bookshelf for more privacy.

L-Shaped

An L-shaped room gives the opportunity to almost create two separate bedrooms, making it a perfect fit for twin beds. Here, the beds are pushed into the corners (not usually a problem for twin beds, as you only need access from one side) and paired with two desks, while the inhabitants' chests of drawers are together under the windows.

Multiple Doors

Walk-in closets and ensuites are great things to have, but a room with multiple doors can be frustrating to arrange. Here you might have to forgo all sense of symmetry, and focus on flow from each doorway. So long as the pathways are clear and each user has an equal-ish amount of floorspace, it should be fine.

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