Are you looking to shake up your look a little — but not wanting to spend a lot of money? Here are six suggestions for perking up your space on a budget: one for every room of your home.

In the Living Room: Plant a tree.
Plants are a great way to (literally) add life to any room. And a big plant, like a fiddle leaf fig or even a citrus tree, reads less like a houseplant and more like a lovely, living piece of furniture.

Spotted on Little Green Notebook.
(Image credit: Little Green Notebook)

In the Dining Room: Add a mismatched chair into your mix.
There's no law that says all your dining chairs have to match. Adding just one mismatched chair (or a couple, at the two ends of your table) can really help change up your dining room look. This is a great place to embrace contrast — if your furniture is super-modern, look for an antique piece, and vice versa.

(Image credit: Plaza Interior)

In the Kitchen: Add a rug.
A rug in the kitchen may seem a little unusual — but it's a great way to add a little color and texture into a space that can often seem sterile or boring. Look for a flatwoven rug, like a kilim, so you can easily sweep up crumbs — or go for an outdoor rug or one you can easily throw in the wash.

More inspiration: More rugs in the kitchen

(Image credit: Design*Sponge)

In the Bathroom: Add some art.
Obviously this is not a place to put the Van Gogh (although the Mona Lisa originally hung in a bathroom at Fontainebleau), but a few well-placed pieces of inexpensive art can add a lot of energy to a bathroom.

Spotted on Lily.
(Image credit: Lily)

In the Bedroom: Switch your nightstand for something a little more out of the box.
A non-nightstandy thing used as a nightstand is a great way to shake up the look of your bedroom — and there are a lot of inexpensive options out there.

(Image credit: Emmas Designblogg)

In the Entryway: Paint an accent wall.
An accent wall will give your entryway just a little extra pizazz. And if your home is too small to have a proper entry, the accent wall will have the additional benefit of setting off your entry area so that it feels like its own entity, and you have a nice transition from the outside world into your home.

Re-edited from a post originally published 12.8.14-NT