Wouldn't You Like to Work Here?

Recently Eric spotlighted some of the workspaces of several notable tech companies, and it was then and there we noted how each company's decor reflected not only the image each wants to project, but also the design aesthetic of the company, alongside notable features which help keep those working inside the office walls motivated and creative. Though not many of us can emulate the scope and variety of these top tier offices, there are a few ideas you can borrow for inspiration...
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Anything Goes: Google Google raised the bar to what an inspiring working environment should look like and each of their worldwide offices reflect an anything goes attitude which reflects an innovative work environment valuing individuality (as long as you bring in results!). Look at the bike lane inside the office hallways, the relaxation room, and all the recreational elements which allow Google employees to stay creative and motivated. They even have on-staff massage experts, offer cafeterias offering menus updated daily.
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Spacious: Twitter Compared with Facebook's anything and everything goes interior decor and office atmosphere, Twitter's San Francisco office has a slightly more focused decor scheme, though still pretty playful.
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The Modernist: Apple Apple's much ballyhooed mother ship headquarters is being readied for takeoff in the new year, aiming to realize Jobs' dream of a modernist and eco-friendly workspace that redefines the office in iconic fashion. Current Cupertino campus offices are actually quite ordinary looking though, as the photo above reveals (though many report of an excellent campus cafe).
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The Playground: Facebook Skateboarding to the conference room, ping pong tables to blow off steam, snacks galore, and a decor scheme optimized for visual creative interaction. We really love this space for its anti-design aesthetic, where the workspace seems as alive as the average person's Facebook page.

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