The New Kitchen Trends We're Anxiously Anticipating

The New Kitchen Trends We're Anxiously Anticipating

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Dabney Frake
Jan 3, 2017
(Image credit: deVOL)

We saw so many beautiful kitchen trends in 2016: tons of marble, rich blue and black cabinets, open shelving, and a mix of materials. While we don't think these things will disappear overnight, we definitely see a shift ahead. If you're thinking about redoing your kitchen soon, or are just design curious, read on for what you can expect to see more of in the coming year, and why we think that's the case.

As the heart of many homes, the kitchen is the most personal. It's our inner sanctum, where friends and family gather for casual meals and conversation. And it's something we can control. When the outside world seems complicated, unpredictable — and sometimes downright unsafe — creating a warm and welcoming environment seems more important than ever. What does that mean for us this year? This is a big picture look at where kitchens are headed in the near future:

Warmer Finishes

(Image credit: My Paradissi)

Subtle, less "look at me" materials will replace sleeker and glossier finishes that now feel too cold. Brushed and plaster walls will add subtle depth and texture. Look for deeper bronze fixtures and lighting to replace brighter metals. New matte finish appliances also leave the shine behind.

Color Shift

(Image credit: House & Garden)

Expect a bunch of new neutrals that work with a wide range of styles, and bring a lot of depth, warmth, and subtlety. Bruised greens, toasted reds, and washed blues are quietly elegant yet still interesting enough to avoid being dull.

(Image credit: Dulux)

Even untraditional colors for the kitchen, like the yellow and pink above, will have a more earthy bent that feels grounded instead of fanciful.

Simplification

(Image credit: Bon Appetit)

As people seek comfort, they often look to the past. Expect to see older style kitchens revisited and reinterpreted for modern day homes. Think updated country, British basic, and Shaker — pared-down traditional styles that get to the root of what is necessary and essential, and are effortlessly warm and inviting. They're not overly decorated, but feel authentic and substantial.

Natural Bent

(Image credit: Bolig Magasinet)

As humans and consumers, we are collectively moving towards more sustainable practices and pieces, and kitchen trends reflect this positive direction. In 2017 we'll see more earthy materials like wood, wicker, cork and clay. Think quality over quantity.

(Image credit: Cle Tile)

Above, antique terracotta and belgian black french reproduction terracotta from Clé Tile, part of their brand new collection. The tiles' rustic surfaces already carry a patina that otherwise comes from age.

Does all of this ring true for you? What are your predictions for the months to come?

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