Kitchen Designers Predict Trends for 2011 and Beyond

At the end of 2010, the National Kitchen & Bath Association (NKBA) surveyed 100 designers about what they considered the hottest kitchen trends in the marketplace for 2011. What did they report? Find out below the jump… 1. Traditional and Shaker Styles. The Shaker style gained momentum in 2010, overtaking contemporary as the second most popular style used by NKBA member designers. Traditional style still dominates, but has fallen to 76%. The shaker style may represent a middle ground between the sleek modern kitchen and the ornate excess of the faux-Tuscan and other versions of "traditional". Shaker-style cabinets often have flat panel doors, installed in an inset style, creating a smooth front on cabinets.

2. Maple Cabinets: Maple overtook cherry as the wood of choice for kitchen cabinetry in the last few months of 2010.

3. Dark Finishes. Dark natural finishes overtook "medium natural, glazed and white painted" finishes to become the most specified type of finish. Distressed finishes dropped significantly in popularity.

4. Kitchen Organization. Unchilled wine storage is gaining in popularity. Wine refrigerators, tall pantry cupboards, pull-out racks and lazy Susans are all on the decline. Appliance garages with roll-up doors are also on the out. It is unclear what storage people are using as alternatives, however.

5. Granite and Quartz. These two continue to be the most requested countertop materials, with marble and butcher block counter showing a significant increase in popularity.

6. Neutral Paint. With the exception of the neutral beiges and grey tones, every color, including white and off-white, remained either level or down from a year earlier.

7. Focus on Trash: Trash or recycling pullouts were huge during the last months of 2010, as were garbage disposals and trash compactors

8. Appliances: French door refrigerators, induction ovens and double wall ovens are hot. Countertop cook units are overtaking ranges.

9. LED Lighting. It is hot (no pun intended).

Are you seeing these predicted shifts? Do you think these predictions are harbingers of welcome change or a sign that kitchen design is about to take a turn for the worse? Or do you chose to ignore such forecasts, either because you don't trust them or because you just don't care about national trends?

For more detail on the report, see Musings From Marketing and the Examiner.

Image: HGTV Pro

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