Literary Style: A Look at the Homes of Famous Writers

Literary Style: A Look at the Homes of Famous Writers

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Jennifer Hunter
Nov 4, 2014
(Image credit: Architectural Digest)

Love literature AND architecture? Check out this collection of homes where some of our most celebrated literary figures did some of their most celebrated works. Can you guess who lived and worked in this stunning house (in a billiards room/writing study hybrid, no less)? Find out.

It was Mark Twain! He lived in this Connecticut Victorian from 1874-1891 during which time he wrote his most famous work, The Adventures of Tom Sawyer.

Orwell

(Image credit: Architectural Digest)

An ailing George Orwell moved into this Scottish farmhouse with his son in 1946 and wrote his final, and most famous novel, 1984.

Hemingway

(Image credit: Architectural Digest)

This Key West Colonial was home to Ernest Hemingway who moved here in 1931 just after A Farewell to Arms was published. In this house, he wrote such short stories as The Snows of Kilimanjaro and The Short Happy Life of Francis Macomber.

Woolf

(Image credit: Architectural Digest)

This 17th century Sussex cottage was the longtime home of Virginia Woolf and her husband until her early death in 1941. It was here she wrote Mrs. Dalloway and also hosted her now-famous Bloomsbury group.

Dickens

(Image credit: Architectural Digest)

Charles Dickens moved into this London home in 1837 and subsequently wrote Oliver Twist. This building still showcases some of Dickens' things, in 1925 it was made into a museum.

Intrigued? There are five more literary homes over at Architectural Digest.

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