Looking at Doorways as Frames into the Next Room

Looking at Doorways as Frames into the Next Room

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Shifrah Combiths
May 18, 2015
(Image credit: Bolaget)

In my house, we have several "doorways" without doors. I've become very conscious of what shows through those doorways from strategic points in adjacent rooms. On one hand, I am careful that nothing messy or otherwise unpleasant to the eyes shows through these openings. But on the other, more fun, hand, I've come to the point of considering these doorways almost as frames and opportunities for layering decor. Here are some homes that show off the neat things you can do by using your doorways as frames.

(Image credit: Carolyn Purnell)

In Rebecca and Eric's Global Territory, a striking statue is placed where it can be seen through a doorway from the living room. Not only is the decor and interest of the living room extended beyond the borders of the room itself, but the drama and intrigue of the statue is accentuated because of its usual and surprising placement.

(Image credit: Rebecca Bond)

Strategically placed flowers in Charlotte and Boris' Quintessentially English Rectory nestle in the frame provided by the doorway of the kitchen and make them seem even larger than they are.

(Image credit: Andrea Sparacio)

In their Vintage Modern Home & Studio, Sarah and Bryan use a lamp turned on outside the doorway of their kitchen to create a sense of warmth. The light shining outside the room is inviting and cozy, extending the promise of relaxation in the rest of the house and in the next phase of the evening.

(Image credit: Anne Wolfe Postic)

The door within a door within a door — to the view of a door in Heather and Jeff's Art (and Dog) Friendly Modern Eclectic is an architectural statement in its own right. The same color paint on each wall highlights the doorways in this case and the black french doors at the end refuse to be overlooked.

(Image credit: Monica Wang)

In contrast to the same-hued doorways, this opening to the next room in Kim Myles' Happy Chic Home uses stark white in the living room to frame the bold color of the dining room. The blue pillow in the living room ties together the two rooms, keeping the flow between the two rooms.

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